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Shades of women

Primal Woman by Sunil Gangopadhyay Harper Perennial, Rs 399

I must start with a confession.

20 years and 200 Tests

Final test: Exit Sachin Tendulkarby Dilip D’Souza Random House, Rs 299

The final hours in flannel

Netagiri reloaded

19CYRUS BROACHA (9).jpg

Funnyman Cyrus broacha writes like he talks, and he likes to write to make people smile. his new book is a satirical take on a power-obsessed society

The final hours in flannel 20 years, 200 Tests

On the morning of November 14, 2013, Dilip D’Souza looked outside his Mumbai home, at the big black gate across the street. A huge press contingent was waiting, but waiting for what, he wondered.

Shades of women

I must start with a confession. I’ve never read anything by Sunil Gangopadhyay before, even though I’ve often picked up copies of his translated works and read the blurbs, wondering if I should get them or not. There are two reasons for this vacillation and ultimate rejection.

An aspyrational journey

Aspyrus
Rs 599

For someone whose stories emerge mostly from the 20 metres around his universe, I am usually in awe of authors who create another universe. And that’s what makes Appupen’s Halahala land so special.

E-books propel China on world stage

Visitors browse Chinese political books at a book fair in Hong Kong.	— AFP

China, the world’s second-biggest book market after the United States, has long been a consumer of works from other countries, now it is making a push to export its own literature abroad, helped by th

While another is resurrected

First, a confession. I have never cared much for Hercule Poirot.

One detective bows out

Henning Mankell

Henning Mankell could not have imagined how successful the Inspector Wallander mysteries would be when, 23 years ago, he published the first in the series.

  • Including Americans pointless, says Peter Carey

    Australian author Peter Carey, who has twice won the Booker Prize for Fiction, slammed the decision to open the Commonwealth award to US writers, as judges prepared to announce the 2014 winner on Tuesday.

    Two US authors are among the six nominees for 2014 Man Booker, one of the highest-profile prizes in English-language literature, with the winner to be announced in a glitzy ceremony at London’s Guildhall late on Tuesday night.

    “There was and there is a real Commonwealth culture. It’s different. America doesn’t really feel to be a part of that,” Carey, 71, told the Guardian newspaper.

    The annual Man Booker Prize was until now awarded for the best original full-length novel written in English by a citizen of the Commonwealth, Ireland or Zimbabwe. But, in 2014, the judges widened the field to any author writing originally in English, so long as their novel is published in Britain within the 12-month entry period. Opening the prize, called the Man Booker since 2002, to US novelists was a bid to establish the prize as the English-speaking world’s foremost literary award.

    “I find it unimaginable that the Pulitzer or the National Book Award people in the United States would ever open their prizes to Brits and Australians. They wouldn’t,” said Carey, one of only three novelists to have scooped the prize twice.

    The winner of the prize receives £50,000, but the award which began in 1969 guarantees a huge upsurge in book sales and a worldwide readership.

    Bookmakers have put Britain’s Indian-born Neel Mukherjee as the 5/2 favourite for The Lives of Others, ahead of Richard Flanagan of Australia with The Narrow Road to the Deep North on 3/1 and then Britain’s Ali Smith at 4/1 for How to be Both.

    Britain’s 2010 winner Howard Jacobson is fourth-favourite at 9/2 with J, ahead of US contenders Karen Joy Fowler on 11/2 with We Are All Completely Beside Ourselves and Joshua Ferris at 8/1 for To Rise Again at a Decent Hour.

    “Oddly this year, the American writers are the two outsiders,” Graham Sharpe, spokesman for bookmakers William Hill, told AFP. “Neel Mukherjee has become the clear favourite,” he said.

After four hours of driving, we should have been in the middle of Dartmoor. And yet we were not.

During Gen Pervez Musharraf’s time a television host asked Benazir Bhutto (BB) about the low attendance at the Pakistan People’s Party jalsas that had just taken place.