Let the controversy rest

It’s as just well that India’s President doesn’t have to go through an electoral test in the Supreme Court even if the court’s verdict dismissing Purno A. Sangma’s challenge was only by a 3-2 majority.

It would have been most embarrassing for the Union of India to have its First Citizen dragged through a full-fledged legal process, including possible cross-examination of a serving President to establish his innocence over an alleged technical offence in not resigning two offices of profit before filing his nomination for the top job.
The motives are clear. No one seeking the presidency would bother to hold on any other posts, ceremonial or otherwise. And it was only a technicality of dates and signatures that was questioned in the case filed by Pranab Mukherjee’s rival for the high office. A majority of the bench held that the litigant had failed to show adequate evidence that might necessitate a fuller hearing. But it was a close call, as two judges obviously didn’t share this view, and they do have a right to their dissenting opinions.
It was in no one’s interest to drag the First Citizen through the humiliation of appearing in court simply to explain how he signs his name and whether he has a long signature as well as a short one. It’s best that the controversy is now laid to rest.

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