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Japan verifying online video claiming hostage execution

Japan’s government said on Saturday it was attempting to verify a video posted online announcing the execution of one of two Japanese hostages held captive by Islamic State (ISIS) militants.

ISIS video on hostage killing angers Shinzo Abe

‘Release remaining captive’

Deadline on Japan’s ISIS captives passes

Japan said on Friday it was still trying to secure the release of two Japanese hostages held by ISIS militants after a deadline to pay ransom for their release passed and there was no immediate word o

Japan plans $42 billion Army budget

Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe’s government approved a record $42 billion military budget on Wednesday, with outlays rising for a third year to counter China’s rising military might.

Tech uses sunlight to purify water

A new Japanese technology that uses sunlight and photocatalysts to turn polluted water into safe drinking water is being tested in India.

New ‘repulsive’ material created

In a world-first, scientists have developed a new hydrogel material whose properties are dominated by electrostatic repulsion — the same force that makes our hair stand on end when we touch a van gene

Top Japan laboratory shrugs off stem cell study

Japan’s top research institute on Friday hammered the final nail in the coffin of what was once billed as a groundbreaking stem cell study, dismissing it as flawed and saying that the work could have

Nissan unveils taxis for disabled people

Nissan NV200

The new taxi is a multi-purpose commercial vehicle, based on Nissan NV200

Prime Minister Shinzo Abe to push for charter rewrite

Prime Minister Shinzo Abe on Monday vowed he would try to persuade a sceptical public of the need to revise Japan’s pacifist Consti-tution, the day after scoring a thumping election victory.

Shinzo Abe re-elected in Japan, but turnout is low

Voters cast votes in Japan's general election at a polling station in Tokyo on Sunday.  — AFP

Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe won comfortable re-election Sunday in a snap poll he had billed as a referendum on his economic policies after early success faded into a recession.

I am happy that we have more tigers today than yesterday. But I am not happy that, as a nation, we are bent on counting tigers and alternately moaning or gloating over it.

The fuss that the TV channels have been making about a debate between the Delhi’s potential chief ministerial candidates like the US presidential candidates do has been baffling because the focus has