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‘Segregation at source solution to solid waste crisis’

THE ASIAN AGE.
Published : Sep 3, 2017, 3:33 am IST
Updated : Sep 3, 2017, 3:33 am IST

Segregation of waste means separating biodegradable and non-biodegradable waste.

A blame-game erupted after the accident with the MCD blaming the Delhi Development Authority (DDA) for not giving them land for more landfill sites.
 A blame-game erupted after the accident with the MCD blaming the Delhi Development Authority (DDA) for not giving them land for more landfill sites.

New Delhi: Terming the Ghazipur landfill incident a disaster in waiting to happen, experts said that the only solution ahead is to reduce the volume of waste generated by the national capital through segregation at source. Segregation of waste means separating biodegradable and non-biodegradable waste. Even after several court ruling and order in this regard, it has been a failed initiative in Delhi.

“What we need to do is reduce the volume of waste that goes to the landfill sites by adopting segregation of waste into categories like dry, wet, and e-waste. It can be processed accordingly; like wet or kitchen waste can be composted into manure which will in turn lead to less waste being dumped at the landfill sites. It’s a long term project,” said environment activist Vikrant Tongad. 

On Friday, a mountain of waste at the Ghazipur landfill site collapsed into a canal, killing two persons and injuring others. A blame-game erupted after the accident with the MCD blaming the Delhi Development Authority (DDA) for not giving them land for more landfill sites. The DDA in turn said that they had provided land but that it was rejected. With the national capital generating 10,000 metric tonnes of waste per day and the three existing landfill sites — Ghazipur, Bhalswa, and Okhla — overflowing, source segregation (people segregating waste at their homes itself) is not being adopted as an option or a solution.  

If segregation is adopted and waste is properly processed thereafter depending on its type, the exercise will save a lot of effort at the end of the chain. This way, very less would have to be dumped at the landfill sites.

According to experts out of the total waste generated, 50 per cent is fit for composting and 30 per cent is recyclable. Only 20 per cent should reach the landfills. “Some of the residential societies, which compost kitchen waste into manure, face criticism from RWAs and sometimes even the MCDs,” said Mr Tongad. 

Tags: delhi development authority, mcd
Location: India, Delhi, New Delhi