Wednesday, Jul 08, 2020 | Last Update : 11:23 AM IST

106th Day Of Lockdown

Maharashtra2171211185589250 Tamil Nadu118594711161636 Delhi102831742173165 Gujarat37636267441978 Uttar Pradesh2996819627313 Telangana2761216287313 Karnataka2681511100417 West Bengal2383715790804 Rajasthan2140416575472 Andhra Pradesh211979745252 Haryana1799913645279 Madhya Pradesh1562711768622 Bihar12525933898 Assam12523833016 Odisha10097670354 Jammu and Kashmir89315399143 Punjab67494554175 Kerala5895345228 Chhatisgarh3415272814 Uttarakhand3230262143 Jharkhand3018210422 Goa190311568 Tripura171612481 Manipur14307710 Himachal Pradesh107876410 Puducherry104351714 Nagaland6443030 Chandigarh4924017 Arunachal Pradesh270922 Mizoram1971390 Sikkim125650 Meghalaya94432
  Life   Health  20 Nov 2019  Husbands’ stress levels increase when wives contribute significantly to household

Husbands’ stress levels increase when wives contribute significantly to household

ANI
Published : Nov 20, 2019, 11:36 am IST
Updated : Nov 20, 2019, 11:36 am IST

Stress in husbands increases if wives earn more than 40 per cent of household income: Study.

Men reported better mental health than their wives reported on their behalf. (Photo: ANI)
 Men reported better mental health than their wives reported on their behalf. (Photo: ANI)

Washington: A recent study shows that husbands are least stressed when their wives earn up to 40 per cent of household income but they become increasingly uncomfortable as their spouse's wages rise beyond that point.

The study was published in the journal, 'Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin.'

The study of over 6,000 American heterosexual couples over 15 years showed husbands are at their most anxious when they are the sole breadwinner, shouldering all the burden of responsibility for the household's finances. Stress levels decline as their wives' earnings approach 40 per cent of household income. But as women's earnings go through that point, the study showed husbands' stress levels gradually increasing.

"These findings suggest that social norms about male breadwinning - and traditional conventions about men earning more than their wives - can be dangerous for men's health. They also show how strong and persistent are gender identity norms," said one of the authors, Dr. Joanna Syrda, an economist at the University of Bath's School of Management.

"This is a large study but of a specific group - other conventions apply in other groups and societies and the results may change as times move on. However, the results are strong enough to point to the persistence of gender identity norms, and to their part in male mental health issues. Persistent distress can lead to many adverse health problems, including physical illness, and mental, emotional and social problems," Syrda said.

Figures from the Pew Research Centre in the US showed only 13 per cent of married women earned more than their husbands in 1980. But by 2017 the figure was close to one third and the trend was likely to continue. Dr. Syrda said she and other researchers were increasingly interested in how this would affect social norms, wellbeing, and our understanding of masculinity.

"The consequences of traditional gender role reversals in marriages associated with wives' higher earnings span multiple dimensions, including physical and mental health, life satisfaction, marital fidelity, divorce, and marital bargaining power," Dr. Syrda said.

"With masculinity closely associated with the conventional view of the male breadwinner, traditional social gender norms mean men may be more likely to experience psychological distress if they become the secondary earner in the household or become financially dependent on their wives, a finding that has implications for managing male mental health and society's understanding of masculinity itself," she said.

Dr. Syrda said her study also sheds light on the 'bargaining power' between husband and wife.

"The elevated psychological distress that comes with husbands' economic dependence on their wives can also have practical underpinnings due to bargaining in the shadow of dissolution or the fear of reduced economic status in the event of an actual divorce. These effects are larger among cohabiting couples, possibly due to the higher probability of dissolution," she added.

The study also showed a disparity in the way husbands and wives assessed their own psychological distress and that of their partner. Survey respondents were asked to measure distress in terms of feeling sad, nervous, restless, hopeless, worthless, or that everything was an effort. Men reported better mental health than their wives reported on their behalf.

Tags: stress levels, spousal relations, mental health