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Bard as the model

Published : Apr 15, 2016, 11:07 pm IST
Updated : Apr 15, 2016, 11:07 pm IST

William Shakespeare remains one of the most quoted writers in the world of English literature. His influence on the English lexicon is well known.

Karishma  Attari
 Karishma Attari

William Shakespeare remains one of the most quoted writers in the world of English literature. His influence on the English lexicon is well known. However, it is the same language that often intimidates young readers. Through her workshop, author Karishma Attari wants to change that notion. “If you stop focussing on language and start reading in the larger context then there is a lot more to enjoy in the works of Shakespeare,” says Karishma, who will be conducting a workshop titled Storytell Like Shakespeare.

According to her, Shakespeare has been always relevant to the world, perhaps a bit more in the today’s age. “Shakespeare was a storyteller and he was a complete crowd-pleaser. Today, if you look for Shakespeare on IMDB (a cinema web portal), you will find more than 1400 titles, which means that people are constantly adapting his works. Even in Bollywood, his plays keep getting adapted. Romeo and Juliet has been an inspiration for ages. So Shakespeare’s work has become a cultural reference,” she says.

Karishma further points out the impact that Shakespeare has had on the language we use today and says, “Today, when we speak, so many of the words and phrases we use actually come from his works. We often use it without knowing so. For example, when we use words like ‘birthplace’ or ‘smooth-faced’, we are using words invented by him. In fact, the knock-knock jokes come from Macbeth. So in a way Shakespeare is already a part of all of us and we cannot ignore that,” she adds.

At the workshop, Karishma will expand the scope of understanding the Bard with reference to the craft of storytelling. “Right from an aspiring writer to a filmmaker or entrepreneur, everybody needs to tell stories and I would like to give them an idea about where to start from. Once one knows the rules, then they are free to follow or break them,” says the author of I See You.

She promises that the workshop won’t be a serious academic discourse. “A big focus will be on breaking down the language. Once that is done, I’m sure people will find his work quite accessible and enjoy the work more. Shakespeare wrote for the people and I want to bring Shakespeare to the people and not restrict him to the academic world,” she says.

The workshop is also commemorating Shakespeare 400th death anniversary.

On April 17, 6 pm, At The Hive, 50-A, Huma Mansion, Off Union Park, Khar (W) Entry: Rs 600