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Artificial sweeteners do not assist weight loss, says study

ANI
Published : Jan 3, 2019, 5:22 pm IST
Updated : Jan 3, 2019, 5:22 pm IST

Sugar-free sweeteners may help cut off sugar but no evidence in losing weight.

Low intake of sugar-free sweeteners slightly less the weight gain than higher intake.
 Low intake of sugar-free sweeteners slightly less the weight gain than higher intake.

Washington: The findings of a recent study suggest that artificial sweeteners may not help with weight loss. The research, published in the journal The BMJ, also stated that there is not enough evidence on their safety.

Growing concerns about health and quality of life have encouraged many people to adopt healthier lifestyles and avoid foods rich in sugars, salt, or fat. Foods and drinks containing non-sugar sweeteners rather than regular sugars have therefore become increasingly popular.

Although several non-sugar sweeteners are approved for use, less is known about their potential benefits and harms within acceptable daily intakes because the evidence is often limited and conflicting.

To better understand these potential benefits and harms, a team of European researchers analysed 56 studies comparing no intake or lower intake of non-sugar sweeteners with higher intake in healthy adults and children.

Measures included weight, blood sugar (glycaemic) control, oral health, cancer, cardiovascular disease, kidney disease, mood and behaviour. Studies were assessed for bias and certainty of evidence.

Overall, the results show that, for most outcomes, there seemed to be no statistically or clinically relevant differences between those exposed to non-sugar sweeteners and those not exposed, or between different doses of non-sugar sweeteners.

For example, in adults, findings from a few small studies suggested small improvements in body mass index and fasting blood glucose levels with non-sugar sweeteners, but the certainty of this evidence was low.

Lower intakes of non-sugar sweeteners were associated with slightly less weight gain (-0.09 kg) than higher intakes, but again the certainty of this evidence was low.

In children, a smaller increase in body mass index score was seen with non-sugar sweeteners compared with sugar, but intake of non-sugar sweeteners made no differences to body weight and no good evidence of any effect of non-sugar sweeteners was found for overweight or obese adults or children actively trying to lose weight.

In a linked editorial, Vasanti Malik at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health agrees that more studies are needed to understand the potential health effects of non-sugar sweeteners and to guide policy development.

Based on existing evidence, she says use of non-sugar sweeteners as a replacement for free sugars, particularly in sugar-sweetened drinks, "could be a helpful strategy to reduce cardiometabolic risk [chances of having diabetes, heart disease or stroke] among heavy consumers, with the ultimate goal of switching to water or other healthy drinks."

Tags: sugar-free, sweeteners, weight loss, calories, sugar, cold drinks, cardiometabolic risk
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