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  World   South Asia  28 Mar 2018  Myanmar parliament elects Suu Kyi loyalist Win Myint as new president

Myanmar parliament elects Suu Kyi loyalist Win Myint as new president

AP
Published : Mar 28, 2018, 12:57 pm IST
Updated : Mar 28, 2018, 12:57 pm IST

Myanmar’s military ruled for 50 yrs during which it was blamed of widespread abuses before partly handing power to a civilian govt in 2016.

Win Myint, 66, is a Suu Kyi loyalist of many years and a stalwart member of her National League for Democracy, an affiliation which earned him a brief spell as a political prisoner more than two decades ago under the previous military government. (Photo: AP)
 Win Myint, 66, is a Suu Kyi loyalist of many years and a stalwart member of her National League for Democracy, an affiliation which earned him a brief spell as a political prisoner more than two decades ago under the previous military government. (Photo: AP)

Naypyitaw (Myanmar): Myanmar’s parliament on Wednesday elected Win Myint, a loyalist of Aung San Suu Kyi, as new president, while she retained her executive authority over the government.

The vote comes as Suu Kyi’s civilian government has struggled to implement peace and national reconciliation, with the powerful military still embroiled in combat with ethnic rebels and under heavy international criticism for its brutal counterinsurgency campaign against the Muslim Rohingya minority.

Myanmar’s military ruled the country for a half-century during which it was accused of widespread abuses before partially handing power to a civilian government in 2016. It is still in charge of security matters and still faces accusations of rights abuses.

Like his predecessor Htin Kyaw, who retired last week for reasons of ill health, Win Myint, 66, is a Suu Kyi loyalist of many years and a stalwart member of her National League for Democracy, an affiliation which earned him a brief spell as a political prisoner more than two decades ago under the previous military government.

When Suu Kyi’s government was installed in 2016, she explained that she would be “above the president,” a situation amenable to both the president and the public.

The job of state counsellor was created especially for Suu Kyi because she is constitutionally banned from the presidency. A clause in the 2008 military-drafted constitution bars anyone with a foreign spouse or child from holding the job. It clearly targeted Suu Kyi, whose two sons are British, as was her late husband.

Myanmar’s president is elected by a joint sitting of the two houses of parliament from among the country’s three vice presidents, representing respectively the lower house, the upper house and the military, which under the constitution holds special privileges in the country’s administration including a 25 percent share of parliamentary seats and the three security portfolios in the Cabinet.

The NLD’s landslide election victory in late 2015 gave it large majorities in both houses.

Win Myint received 403 votes of the combined houses against 211 for Myint Swe, the military’s nominee, and 18 for Vice President Henry Van Tio.

Win Myint, who resigned as speaker of the lower house last week, was a successful parliamentary candidate in the 1990 general election that was invalidated by the military, denying him his seat. He was elected in 2012 and again in 2015.

Born in the Irrawaddy Delta in 1951, Win Myint won his degree in geology in Yangon, only to become a lawyer in the 1980s. His involvement with the NLD began when it was established during the failed anti-military uprising of 1988, which led to his brief stint in prison. In 2010, he became a member of the Central Executive Committee of Suu Kyi’s party.

“Win Myint was educated as a lawyer and has been loyal to the party as well,” said Aung Shin, a close friend and colleague. “More importantly, he has always worked together with Aung San Suu Kyi and they have mutual trust. I see him as a very reliable person who will be a great president for the country, and people are very optimistic about him.”

An independent analyst, Khin Zaw Win, director of the Tampadipa Institute, a policy advocacy group, questioned whether Win Myint’s fealty to Suu Kyi was an asset.

“To those who are asking, he will be forever Aung San Suu Kyi’s henchman,” he said. “I don’t expect much change in the presidency, unless Win Myint puts the country’s interests before Aung San Suu Kyi’s and that of the military.”

Tags: aung san suu kyi, win myint, muslim rohingya, myanmar parliament
Location: Myanmar, Rangoon [Yangon], Rangoon (Yangon)