Thursday, Sep 24, 2020 | Last Update : 08:02 AM IST

183rd Day Of Lockdown

Maharashtra122438091634833015 Andhra Pradesh6317495518215410 Tamil Nadu5473374919718871 Karnataka5268764233778145 Uttar Pradesh3588932895945135 Delhi2492592133045014 West Bengal2283021989834421 Odisha184122149379763 Telangana1726081419301042 Bihar169856155824870 Assam159320129130578 Kerala13863398720554 Gujarat1247671051913337 Rajasthan116881972841352 Haryana113075908841177 Madhya Pradesh108167836182007 Punjab99930754092860 Chhatisgarh8618347653680 Jharkhand7267358543626 Jammu and Kashmir65026421151024 Uttarakhand4177729000501 Goa2875322726360 Puducherry2319118065467 Tripura2227215441245 Himachal Pradesh124387836125 Chandigarh102987411123 Manipur9010683859 Arunachal Pradesh7385540813 Nagaland5544445110 Meghalaya4733252838 Sikkim2447190529 Mizoram158510120
  World   Americas  31 Jan 2020  Telescope in Hawaii captures Sun in great detail

Telescope in Hawaii captures Sun in great detail

AFP
Published : Jan 31, 2020, 2:07 pm IST
Updated : Jan 31, 2020, 2:07 pm IST

The Daniel K. Inouye Solar Telescope on the island of Maui has a 13-foot (four meters) mirror, the world's largest for a solar telescope.

'Boiling' plasma that covers the Sun is seen in the highest-ever resolution images of the star, taken by the new Daniel K. Inouye Solar telescope. AFP Photo
 'Boiling' plasma that covers the Sun is seen in the highest-ever resolution images of the star, taken by the new Daniel K. Inouye Solar telescope. AFP Photo

Washington: A huge telescope built on the peak of a Hawaiian island has produced pictures of the Sun's surface in unprecedented detail, revealing boiling plasma cells.

The Daniel K. Inouye Solar Telescope on the island of Maui has a 13-foot (four meters) mirror, the world's largest for a solar telescope.
"These images have the highest resolution that you've ever seen," said Thomas Rimmele, the telescope's director.

 

"We now see structures that we suspected would be there, based on computer models, but we never had the resolution to really see them," added the 60-year-old German astronomer.

Images first published on Wednesday show a pattern of boiling plasma covering the Sun in cell-like structures. These are the result of violent motions transporting heat from the star's interior to its surface.

The hot plasma rises in the bright center of the cells, cools and then sinks below the surface in a process called convection.

The telescope came online on December 10 after nine years of construction. "It was a really emotional moment, I was really happy," said Rimmele, who joined the project 25 years ago before eventually becoming its director. "It's my life's work."
Since the telescope focuses sunlight over a small area, it produces an enormous amount of heat.

 

"It gets really hot there, you can put metal there and it melts within a very short time," said Rimmele.

Corona and sunspots
It will take six more months to install additional scientific instruments and make the telescope fully operational.

Ultimately, the goal is to measure the magnetic fields in the Sun's atmosphere, and in particular in its corona, its outermost area that can be distinguished during an eclipse.
The magnetic fields govern solar flares that can affect air travel, disrupt satellite communications as well as bring down power grids and disable GPS, a relatively common event.

Mapping the Sun will thus help scientists deepen their understanding of these magnetic fields that regulate space weather, allowing us to anticipate storms and turn off sensitive equipment ahead of time.

 

The telescope has launched at an exciting time for astronomers: the Sun is about to enter a new 11-year cycle, in which it will start to produce new sunspots.
It is currently at the low ebb of its cycle and no spots are visible.

"That is the goal, to publish a close up image, highest resolution image ever of a sunspot," said Rimmele.

Tags: hawaii telescope, sun