Friday, Sep 25, 2020 | Last Update : 04:39 PM IST

185th Day Of Lockdown

Maharashtra128396397321434345 Andhra Pradesh6543855794745558 Tamil Nadu5636915082109076 Karnataka5485574446588331 Uttar Pradesh3742773076115366 Delhi2606232243755123 West Bengal2378692080424606 Odisha196888161044805 Telangana1792461481391070 Bihar174266159700878 Assam165582135141608 Kerala15445898720614 Gujarat1289491093113382 Rajasthan1227201023301352 Haryana118554984101177 Madhya Pradesh115361814752007 Punjab105220814752860 Chhatisgarh9562358833680 Jharkhand7643862945626 Jammu and Kashmir68614480791024 Uttarakhand4440432154501 Goa3055224347360 Puducherry2489519311467 Tripura2378616955245 Himachal Pradesh133869232125 Chandigarh109688342123 Manipur9537736959 Arunachal Pradesh8416607113 Nagaland5730459810 Meghalaya4733252838 Sikkim2447190529 Mizoram158510120
  Technology   In Other news  24 Apr 2018  Facebook releases long-secret rules on how it polices the service

Facebook releases long-secret rules on how it polices the service

REUTERS
Published : Apr 24, 2018, 4:51 pm IST
Updated : Apr 24, 2018, 4:51 pm IST

The company has released a rule book for the types of posts it allows on its social network.

Facebook for years has had “community standards” for what people can post.
 Facebook for years has had “community standards” for what people can post.

Facebook Inc on Tuesday released a rule book for the types of posts it allows on its social network, giving far more detail than ever before on what is permitted on subjects ranging from drug use and sex work to bullying, hate speech and inciting violence.

Facebook for years has had “community standards” for what people can post. But only a relatively brief and general version was publicly available, while it had a far more detailed internal document to decide when individual posts or accounts should be removed. Now, the company is providing the longer document on its website to clear up confusion and be more open about its operations, said Monika Bickert, Facebook’s vice president of product policy and counter-terrorism.

 

“You should, when you come to Facebook, understand where we draw these lines and what’s OK and what’s not OK,” Bickert told reporters in a briefing at Facebook’s headquarters.

Facebook has faced fierce criticism from governments and rights groups in many countries for failing to do enough to stem hate speech and prevent the service from being used to promote terrorism, stir sectarian violence and broadcast acts including murder and suicide.

At the same time, the company has also been accused of doing the bidding of repressive regimes by aggressively removing content that crosses governments and providing too little information on why certain posts and accounts are removed.

 

New policies will, for the first time, allow people to appeal a decision to take down an individual piece of content. Previously, only the removal of accounts, Groups and Pages could be appealed. Facebook is also beginning to provide the specific reason why content is being taken down for a wider variety of situations.

Facebook, the world’s largest social network, has become a dominant source of information in many countries around the world. It uses both automated software and an army of moderators that now numbers 7,500 to take down text, pictures and videos that violate its rules. Under pressure from several governments, it has been beefing up its moderator ranks since last year.

 

Bickert told Reuters in an interview that the standards are constantly evolving, based in part on feedback from more than 100 outside organizations and experts in areas such as counter-terrorism and child exploitation.

“Everybody should expect that these will be updated frequently,” she said. The company considers changes to its content policy every two weeks at a meeting called the “Content Standards Forum,” led by Bickert. A small group of reporters was allowed to observe the meeting last week on the condition that they could describe the process, but not substance.

At the April 17 meeting, about 25 employees sat around a conference table while others joined by video from New York, Dublin, Mexico City, Washington and elsewhere.

 

Attendees included people who specialize in public policy, legal matters, product development, communication and other areas. They heard reports from smaller working groups, relayed feedback they had gotten from civil rights groups and other outsiders and suggested ways that a policy or product could go wrong in the future. There was little mention of what competitors such as Alphabet Inc’s Google do in similar situations.

Bickert, a former US federal prosecutor, posed questions, provided background and kept the discussion moving. The meeting lasted about an hour. Facebook is planning a series of public forums in May and June in different countries to get more feedback on its rules, said Mary deBree, Facebook’s head of content policy.

 

FROM CURSING TO MURDER

The longer version of the community standards document, some 8,000 words long, covers a wide array of words and images that Facebook sometimes censors, with a detailed discussion of each category.

Videos of people wounded by cannibalism are not permitted, for instance, but such imagery is allowed with a warning screen if it is “in a medical setting.” Facebook has long made clear that it does not allow people to buy and sell prescription drugs, marijuana or firearms on the social network, but the newly published document details what another speech on those subjects is permitted.

Content in which someone “admits to personal use of non-medical drugs” should not be posted on Facebook, the rulebook says. The document elaborates on harassment and bullying, barring for example “cursing at a minor.” It also prohibits content that comes from a hacked source, “except in limited cases of newsworthiness.”

 

The new community standards do not incorporate separate procedures under which governments can demand the removal of content that violates local law. In those cases, Bickert said, formal written requests are required and are reviewed by Facebook’s legal team and outside attorneys. Content deemed to be permissible under community standards but in violation of the local law - such as a prohibition in Thailand on disparaging the royal family - are then blocked in that country, but not globally.

The community standards also do not address false information - Facebook does not prohibit it but it does try to reduce its distribution - or other contentious issues such as the use of personal data.

 

Tags: facebook, data breach, social media