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  Technology   Gadgets  27 Jul 2018  Windows 10 to be more proactive while installing updates from now

Windows 10 to be more proactive while installing updates from now

THE ASIAN AGE
Published : Jul 27, 2018, 7:48 pm IST
Updated : Jul 27, 2018, 7:48 pm IST

Microsoft’s latest beta update for Windows 10 uses Machine Learning to reboot PCs only when the user isn’t using it.

Microsoft is banking on Machine Learning — the computer will now learn the usage patterns over the time. (Representative Photo)
 Microsoft is banking on Machine Learning — the computer will now learn the usage patterns over the time. (Representative Photo)

If you have to point out one irritating feature of Windows 10, it has to be the auto reboot for installing Windows updates. Whether you are preparing for your business meeting’s presentation or completed 95 per cent of the stage on your favourite game, if Windows has downloaded an update, it will try to install it as soon as it can, without considering whether the PC is being actually used or not. Microsoft looks set to fix the issue, which is why they are testing a new feature to make Windows 10 more sensible in this regard.

Microsoft is testing a new feature on the latest Insider Ring of the latest Windows 10 build that will let the PC install updates only when it isn’t being used. For this, Microsoft is banking on Machine Learning — the computer will now learn the usage patterns over the time. It will then predict when the system can be free to let the system updates being installed. Microsoft believes that this is an efficient and clever way to utilise time and resources in order to keep the PC safe.

 

"We trained a predictive model that can accurately predict when the right time to restart the device is. Meaning, that we will not only check if you are currently using your device before we restart, but we will also try to predict if you had just left the device to grab a cup of coffee and return shortly after," says Microsoft's oficial blog.

Microsoft has been trying to tackle this issue in the past as well. A few years ago, Windows 10 got a feature called Active Hours, which essentially required manual input of preferred time by the user to let the system install security updates and patches. However, it didn’t always work as intended, with many users looking for a more robust and smarter system in place to handle the issue. The new feature has just rolled out and we will have to wait and see whether it makes any difference to the user experience of Windows 10 when it comes to updates installation. Microsoft's internal testing has claimed to fetch promising results so far.

 

(source)

Tags: windows 10, microsoft