Thursday, Oct 01, 2020 | Last Update : 11:12 AM IST

189th Day Of Lockdown

Maharashtra1351153104994735751 Andhra Pradesh6811616123005745 Tamil Nadu5863975307089383 Karnataka5824584697508641 Uttar Pradesh3908753312705652 Delhi2730982407035272 West Bengal2505802198444837 Odisha212609177585866 Telangana1872111564311107 Kerala179923121264698 Bihar178882164537888 Assam169985139977655 Gujarat1332191132403417 Rajasthan1288591077181441 Haryana1237821059901307 Madhya Pradesh117588932382207 Punjab107096840253134 Chhatisgarh9856566860777 Jharkhand7770964515661 Jammu and Kashmir69832495571105 Uttarakhand4533233642555 Goa3107125071386 Puducherry2548919781494 Tripura2412717464262 Himachal Pradesh136799526152 Chandigarh112128677145 Manipur9791760263 Arunachal Pradesh8649623014 Nagaland5768469311 Meghalaya5158334343 Sikkim2707199431 Mizoram178612880
  Science   09 Sep 2019  Now you can defrost surfaces in seconds!

Now you can defrost surfaces in seconds!

ANI
Published : Sep 9, 2019, 7:46 am IST
Updated : Sep 9, 2019, 7:46 am IST

The researchers established a technique that melts the ice where the surface and the ice meet, so the ice can simply slide off.

The group hasn't studied more complicated surfaces like airplanes yet, but they think it's an obvious future step. (Photo: ANI)
 The group hasn't studied more complicated surfaces like airplanes yet, but they think it's an obvious future step. (Photo: ANI)

A new study has found a way to remove ice from surfaces using an extremely energy-efficient method.

A group of researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and Kyushu University developed the way by using less than 1 per cent of the energy and less than 0.01 per cent of the time needed for traditional defrosting methods.

 

The group described the method in the journal Applied Physics Letters from AIP Publishing.

Instead of conventional defrosting, which melts all the ice or frost from the top layer down, the researchers established a technique that melts the ice where the surface and the ice meet, so the ice can simply slide off.

"The work was motivated by the large energy efficiency losses of building energy systems and refrigeration systems due to the need to do intermittent defrosting. The systems must be shut down, the working fluid is heated up, then it needs to be cooled down again," said author Nenad Miljkovic, at UIUC.

"This eats up a lot of energy when you think of the yearly operational costs of running intermittent defrosting cycles," added Miljkovic.

 

According to the authors, the biggest source of inefficiency in conventional systems is that much of the energy used for de-icing goes into heating other components of the system rather than directly heating the frost or ice. This increases energy consumption and system downtime.

Instead, the researchers proposed delivering a pulse of very high current where the ice and the surface meet to create a layer of water. To ensure the pulse reaches the intended space rather than melting the exposed ice, the researchers apply a thin coating of indium tin oxide (ITO) -- a conductive film often used for defrosting -- to the surface of the material. Then, they leave the rest to gravity.

 

To test this, the scientists defrosted a small glass surface cooled to minus 15.1 degrees Celsius -- about as cold as the warmest parts of Antarctica -- and to minus 71 degrees Celsius -- colder than the coldest parts of Antarctica.

These temperatures were chosen to model heating, ventilation, air conditioning, and refrigeration applications and aerospace applications, respectively. In all tests, the ice was removed with a pulse lasting less than one second.

In a real 3D system, gravity would be assisted by airflow.

"At scale, it all depends on the geometry. However, the efficiency of this approach should definitely still be much better than conventional approaches."

 

The group hasn't studied more complicated surfaces like airplanes yet, but they think it's an obvious future step," Miljkovic said.

"They are a natural extension as they travel fast, so the shear forces on the ice are large, meaning only a very thin layer at the interface needs to be melted in order to remove the ice," Miljkovic asserted.

Tags: defrosting, science