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  Science   08 Jan 2020  Study allows artificial neural connection to regain control of paralysed hand

Study allows artificial neural connection to regain control of paralysed hand

ANI
Published : Jan 8, 2020, 3:34 pm IST
Updated : Jan 8, 2020, 3:34 pm IST

The study showed an ANC successfully allowing a new cortical site to regain control of a paralysed hand within minutes.

In this research, experimental animals regained voluntary control of a paralyzed hand about ten minutes after the establishment of an ANC. (Photo: AFP)
 In this research, experimental animals regained voluntary control of a paralyzed hand about ten minutes after the establishment of an ANC. (Photo: AFP)

Restoration of lost motor function after stroke is typically accomplished after strenuous rehabilitation therapy lasting for over months. However, new research showed that an artificial neural connection (ANC) successfully allowed a new cortical site, previously unassociated with hand movements, to regain control of a paralysed hand in a matter of minutes.

In this research, experimental animals regained voluntary control of a paralyzed hand about ten minutes after the establishment of an ANC. Animals engaged in learning with a functional ANC showed variable levels of input signals provided by the cerebral cortex as hand movement improved. Specifically, the activated area of the cortex became more focused as control of hand movements improved.

 

The study was published in the journal Nature Communications.

Through this training of various areas of the cerebral cortex, the research team successfully imparted a new ability to control paralysed hands via an ANC, even if those areas were not involved in hand control prior to the stroke.

Examples of such regions include areas of the cortex that controls the movement of other body parts such as the face or shoulder, and even the somatosensory cortex, which is responsible for tactile and proprioception processing and is normally not associated with motor control. This finding suggests that an ANC can impart new motor control functions to any cortical region.

 

This research will contribute to the development of innovative therapies that will help stroke patients regain lost motor function by imparting this function to regions of the cerebral cortex previously not associated with hand movement.

It is expected that these therapies will have practical clinical applications beyond restoring motor function and lead to the development of novel techniques to further integrate human brains with computers.

The researchers will continue to investigate whether extended use of an ANC will enhance the activity of spared neural networks and facilitate functional recovery so that patients will be able to regain voluntary control of paralysed body parts even if they discontinue using the ANC.

 

Tags: paralysis, neurology