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  Science   06 Dec 2019  Study reveals that carbon emissions from volcanic rocks play a role in global warming

Study reveals that carbon emissions from volcanic rocks play a role in global warming

ANI
Published : Dec 6, 2019, 10:45 am IST
Updated : Dec 6, 2019, 10:45 am IST

This discovery could possibly change the way scientists have predicted climate change.

The discovery implies that greenhouse gases released directly by LIPs can initiate global change that persists over 10,000 to 100,000 years. (Photo: Reuters)
 The discovery implies that greenhouse gases released directly by LIPs can initiate global change that persists over 10,000 to 100,000 years. (Photo: Reuters)

According to a new study, emissions of Greenhouse gases released directly through the movement of volcanic rocks have the capability of creating global warming effects and this discovery has the potential in transforming the way scientists predict climate change.

The researchers reported the study in the journal Nature Communications. The calculations of scientists of how levels of carbon-based greenhouse gas link to the movements of magma present below the surface of earth suggest that such geological changes have caused the global warming from the past 65 million years.

 

Geologists at the University of Birmingham have created the first mechanistic model of carbon emissions changes during the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) - a short interval of maximum temperature lasting around 1,00,000 years some 55 million years ago.

The findings were published in Nature Communications, after calculations of carbon-based greenhouse gas fluxes that are associated with North Atlantic Igneous Province (NAIP) which is one of Earth's largest LIPs (Large Igneous Provinces) that covers Britain, Ireland, Norway and Greenland.

"Large Igneous Provinces are linked to spikes of change in global climate, ecosystems and the carbon cycle throughout Mesozoic time - coinciding with the Earth's most devastating mass extinctions and oceans becoming strongly depleted of oxygen," said Dr Stephen Jones, Senior Lecturer in Earth Systems at the University of Birmingham.

 

"We calculated carbon-based greenhouse gas fluxes associated with the NAIP - linking measurements of the process that generated magma with observations of the individual geological structures that controlled gas emissions. These calculations suggest the NAIP caused the largest transient global warming of the past 65 million years," he added.

Associations between LIPs and changes in global climate, ecosystems and the carbon cycle during the Mesozoic period imply that greenhouse gases released directly by LIPs can initiate global change that persists over 10,000 to 100,000 years.

The PETM is the largest natural climate change event of Cenozoic time and an important yardstick for theories explaining today's long-term increase in the average temperature of Earth's atmosphere as an effect of human industry and agriculture.

 

Tags: volcanic activity