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  Photos   World   06 Sep 2019  Lesotho -- first country to allow cultivation of cannabis for medicinal purposes

Lesotho -- first country to allow cultivation of cannabis for medicinal purposes

AFP

Published : Sep 6, 2019, 3:38 pm IST
Updated : Feb 9, 2020, 2:34 pm IST
Women workers pick up leaves from cannabis plants inside a greenhouse of Medigrow, a Lesotho- Canadian company that grows legal cannabis, located near Marakabei, Lesotho. In 2017, the tiny landlocked kingdom of 2.1 million people decided to tap into the booming medical marijuana industry, becoming the first counrty in Africa to allow the cultivation of cannabis for medicinal purposes. (Photo: AFP)
Women workers pick up leaves from cannabis plants inside a greenhouse of Medigrow, a Lesotho- Canadian company that grows legal cannabis, located near Marakabei, Lesotho. In 2017, the tiny landlocked kingdom of 2.1 million people decided to tap into the booming medical marijuana industry, becoming the first counrty in Africa to allow the cultivation of cannabis for medicinal purposes. (Photo: AFP)
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Mothiba Thamae (L) works with his employees in a farm near Maseru. He has been growing apples, peaches and raisins on 7.5 hectares (18.5 acres) of land for over two decades. He can not afford the 'green gold' licence. 'We hoped the government would give small Basotho farmers the opportunity to cultivate (cannabis) legally,"said the 38-year-old, referring to Lesotho's main ethnic group. "Unfortunately, the did not." (Photo: AFP)
Mothiba Thamae (L) works with his employees in a farm near Maseru. He has been growing apples, peaches and raisins on 7.5 hectares (18.5 acres) of land for over two decades. He can not afford the 'green gold' licence. 'We hoped the government would give small Basotho farmers the opportunity to cultivate (cannabis) legally,"said the 38-year-old, referring to Lesotho's main ethnic group. "Unfortunately, the did not." (Photo: AFP)
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A scientist from Lucan Labs, a lab specialised in analysing cannabis, works on samples. "We have three rows that contain 1,200 plants each. That's 3,600 plants across the whole structure," said Medigrow's head of production Albert Theron. (Photo: AFP)
A scientist from Lucan Labs, a lab specialised in analysing cannabis, works on samples. "We have three rows that contain 1,200 plants each. That's 3,600 plants across the whole structure," said Medigrow's head of production Albert Theron. (Photo: AFP)
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A scientist from Lucan Labs, a lab specialised in analysing cannabis, works on samples. "We have three rows that contain 1,200 plants each. That's 3,600 plants across the whole structure," said Medigrow's head of production Albert Theron. (Photo: AFP)
A scientist from Lucan Labs, a lab specialised in analysing cannabis, works on samples. "We have three rows that contain 1,200 plants each. That's 3,600 plants across the whole structure," said Medigrow's head of production Albert Theron. (Photo: AFP)
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Three workers from Medigrow look for infections in a cannabis plant inside a greenhouse located near Marakabei.The United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime estimates that 70 percent of marijuana consumed in South Africa is grown in Lesotho, making cannabis the country’s third source of revenue. “The first historical trace of matekoane dates back to the 16th century,” said Laurent Laniel, a researcher at the European Monitoring Centre for Drugs and Drug Addiction. (Photo: AFP)
Three workers from Medigrow look for infections in a cannabis plant inside a greenhouse located near Marakabei.The United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime estimates that 70 percent of marijuana consumed in South Africa is grown in Lesotho, making cannabis the country’s third source of revenue. “The first historical trace of matekoane dates back to the 16th century,” said Laurent Laniel, a researcher at the European Monitoring Centre for Drugs and Drug Addiction.  (Photo:  AFP)
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An aerial photograph shows facilities owned by Medigrow. A heliport is also being built to ensure the cannabis -- commonly referred to as “green gold” -- is shipped safely and swiftly, said head of operations Relebohile Liphoto. The investment is spurred by the industry’s positive outlook. The global market for medical cannabis is currently estimated at $150 billion (135 billion euros) and could reach $272 billion in 2028, according to Barclays Bank. (Photo: AFP)
An aerial photograph shows facilities owned by Medigrow. A heliport is also being built to ensure the cannabis -- commonly referred to as “green gold” -- is shipped safely and swiftly, said head of operations Relebohile Liphoto. The investment is spurred by the industry’s positive outlook. The global market for medical cannabis is currently estimated at $150 billion (135 billion euros) and could reach $272 billion in 2028, according to Barclays Bank. (Photo: AFP)
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Lesotho’s deputy health minister Manthabiseng Phohleli (pictured) said that the legalisation of cannabis presented “a huge opportunity for the country” (Photo: AFP)
Lesotho’s deputy health minister Manthabiseng Phohleli (pictured) said that the legalisation of cannabis presented “a huge opportunity for the country” (Photo: AFP)
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A cannabis plant can be seen next to cannabis-based drinks at the ALoCaNN showroom, a company that sells a variety of legal medicinal products in Maseru. The Koena (people) are believed to have settled in Lesotho around 1550 by buying land from San groups in exchange for marijuana. (Photo: AFP)
A cannabis plant can be seen next to cannabis-based drinks at the ALoCaNN showroom, a company that sells a variety of legal medicinal products in Maseru. The Koena (people) are believed to have settled in Lesotho around 1550 by buying land from San groups in exchange for marijuana. (Photo: AFP)
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Tags: Lesotho, cannabis