Friday, Aug 14, 2020 | Last Update : 01:50 PM IST

142nd Day Of Lockdown

Maharashtra54831338184318650 Tamil Nadu3145202563135278 Andhra Pradesh2641421709242378 Karnataka1964941126333511 Delhi1494601343184167 Uttar Pradesh140775887862280 West Bengal98459671202059 Telangana8647563074665 Bihar8274154139450 Gujarat71064542382652 Assam5883842326145 Rajasthan5249738235789 Odisha4592731785321 Haryana4163534781483 Madhya Pradesh3902529020996 Kerala3811424922127 Jammu and Kashmir2489717003472 Punjab2390315319586 Jharkhand185168998177 Chhatisgarh12148880996 Uttarakhand96326134125 Goa871259575 Tripura6161417641 Puducherry5382320187 Manipur3752204411 Himachal Pradesh3371218114 Nagaland30119738 Arunachal Pradesh223115923 Chandigarh1595100425 Meghalaya11154986 Sikkim9105101 Mizoram6203230
  Opinion   Edit  10 Sep 2018  Game, set... fireworks!

Game, set... fireworks!

THE ASIAN AGE
Published : Sep 10, 2018, 12:55 am IST
Updated : Sep 10, 2018, 12:55 am IST

The code violation for coaching is hardly applied at such levels.

Serena Williams talks with chair umpire Carlos Ramos during the women’s final of the US Open tennis tournament in New York on Saturday. (Photo: AP)
 Serena Williams talks with chair umpire Carlos Ramos during the women’s final of the US Open tennis tournament in New York on Saturday. (Photo: AP)

In an instant, the world of women’s tennis exploded, accusations of sexism and recriminations flying as a chair umpire docked Serena Williams a game. The contest, till then dominated by Japan’s Naomi Osaka, descended into a war between a player trying to emulate Evonne Goolagong in winning a Grand Slam as a mother and the umpire, who seemed to apply disciplinary action in the final in an unprecedented manner. An emotional Serena may have been right to protest such officiousness, although her coach admitted he was trying to pass on instructions while the game was on, but Serena was oblivious of it. The code violation for coaching is hardly applied at such levels. It may not have helped that Serena later called the umpire “a liar and a thief”.

The result is a shot in the arm for Asian tennis as Osaka (a Japanese-American dual citizen) joins China’s Li Na as the only Asian winners of Grand Slams. Michael Chang was the product of a powerful US tennis academy in the 1980s when he won the French Open, and may not qualify strictly as an Asian. It’s in the women’s game that Asians have won three Grand Slams. It was gracious of Serena to finally acknowledge the achievement, and ask the crowd to stop booing Osaka. In seeking to separate the issues of a well-deserved victory and the contentious matter of umpires hogging the limelight on big occasions, Serena proved she can still be looked up to, without reservations, as an icon. Sporting acceptance of an official’s actions may seem appropriate at most times, but what happens if someone exceeds his authority in showmanship?

 

Tags: serena williams, grand slams, evonne goolagong