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  Mumbai records poorer air than Delhi

Mumbai records poorer air than Delhi

Published : Dec 29, 2015, 5:06 am IST
Updated : Dec 29, 2015, 5:06 am IST

Mumbai has on Monday recorded a poorer quality of air than Delhi. The city recorded ‘poor’ air quality while a few of the city’s pockets recorded ‘very poor’ level.

File photo for representation only
 File photo for representation only

Mumbai has on Monday recorded a poorer quality of air than Delhi. The city recorded ‘poor’ air quality while a few of the city’s pockets recorded ‘very poor’ level.

Andheri recorded 326 µg/m3 level of particulate matters in size 2.5 (PM 2.5) which is most dangerous for people with respiratory ailments. The figure is one of the highest air pollution recorded in the station this season. World Health Organisation has issued a guideline that stated, “Everyone may experience more or serious health effects. Significant increase in respiratory effects in general population”

Commenting on this, director of National Environmental Engineering Research Institute (NEERI) Rakesh Kumar said, “Generally during winter, the pollution level increases due to the inversion mechanism. Due to heavy air, the pollutants released from vehicles or other sources can’t move to the upper level of atmosphere.”

Explaining the reason for recording higher air pollution on certain days, he said, “Air pollution level is also dependent on the wind flow and climatology of the area.”

As per the data of the Maharashtra State Pollution Control Board (MSPCB), in comparison to last year, the concentration of harmful air pollutants has increased in the city. Moreover, on Monday, Andheri has recorded one of the highest air pollution figures of the season.

The concentration of particulate matters of size 10 (PM10) and 2.5 (PM 2.5) has surged by 40 per cent in comparison to last year. In 2014, the average pollution level of PM 10 was 120 µg/m3 that rose to 177 µg/m3 in 2015. Similarly, in 2014, the city on an average recorded 50 µg/m3 in PM 2.5 that rose to almost 62 µg/m3.

The areas most affected include Worli, Wadala and Andheri. Sumaira Abdulali, environmentalist of the NGO Awaaz Foundation said that increasing number of automobilies and lack of the environmental management in the metro as the main reasons for the surge.

“PMs are most dangerous that goes deep into our heart and leads to respiratory problems. With time, the number of vehicles and houses are increasing but green areas are deteriorating. So, naturally the natural balance of air would get affected increasing the level of pollutants in the air,” Ms Abdulali said.