Sunday, May 31, 2020 | Last Update : 10:24 AM IST

68th Day Of Lockdown

Maharashtra65168280812197 Tamil Nadu2024611313157 Delhi173877846398 Gujarat1635692321007 Rajasthan83654855184 Madhya Pradesh78914444343 Uttar Pradesh77014651213 West Bengal48131775302 Andhra Pradesh3461228960 Bihar3359120915 Karnataka292299749 Telangana2499141277 Jammu and Kashmir234190828 Punjab2197194942 Odisha17239779 Haryana172194019 Kerala120957510 Assam9361044 Uttarakhand493794 Jharkhand4621914 Chhatisgarh4471021 Chandigarh2891994 Tripura2711720 Himachal Pradesh223634 Goa70420 Manipur6060 Puducherry57230 Nagaland3600 Meghalaya27121 Arunachal Pradesh310 Mizoram110 Sikkim100

Trust to demystify maths with workshops

THE ASIAN AGE. | AISHWARYA IYER
Published : Dec 31, 2018, 4:49 am IST
Updated : Dec 31, 2018, 4:49 am IST

RAM imparts the not-so-famous lessons and concepts from 12th centu-ry mathematicians, which are being developed and evolved in India.

RAM was set up by four mathematics educators to bring a change in the outlook towards the subject. (Representational image)
 RAM was set up by four mathematics educators to bring a change in the outlook towards the subject. (Representational image)

Mumbai: Aimed at inculcating mentality for research among high school students with a keen interest in mathematics, Raising a Mathe-matician (RAM) Foundati-on, a Mumbai-based charitable trust, has introduced residential and national-level training workshops to eradicate the fear of mathematics and instil numerical skills, analytical thinking and provide an insight into ancient Indian mathematics.

RAM was set up by four mathematics educators to bring a change in the outlook towards the subject. The foundation covers different techniques in squaring, cubing, compound multiplication and the Karapayadi number system to both students and teachers.

“The same exposure in maths in school, high school and college is given to each and every student. Their knowledge of concepts is more or less limited to mainstream mathematics. Specialisation is absent in these levels and, thus, our idea is to take students who are passionate about maths out of the general examination appr-oach and to a pure and applied form,” Vinay Nair, one of the co-founders of RAM, said. “Lack of awareness and knowledge is the prime reason why this programme plays an important role,” he added.

Mr Nair, who also teaches maths in schools and colleges, said that students aren’t aware of career opportunities for those with a special interest in the subject. “If they are good in maths, they opt for engineering through entrance examinations. Meanwhile, what is left unexplored is financial mathematics, mathematics in computer science, mathematics in economics or even a doctorate in Mathematics. Adding to this, our country, which has well-known mathematics from ancient India, is right now being researched by westerners,” he said.

RAM imparts the not-so-famous lessons and concepts from 12th centu-ry mathematicians, which are being developed and evolved in India.

Currently, all programmes are for high school students, parents and teachers.:

Aimed at inculcating mentality for research among high school students with a keen interest in mathematics, Raising a Mathe-matician (RAM) Foundati-on, a Mumbai-based charitable trust, has introduced residential and national-level training workshops to eradicate the fear of mathematics and instil numerical skills, analytical thinking and provide an insight into ancient Indian mathematics.

RAM was set up by four mathematics educators to bring a change in the outlook towards the subject. The foundation covers different techniques in squaring, cubing, compound multiplication and the Karapayadi number system to both students and teachers.

“The same exposure in maths in school, high school and college is given to each and every student. Their knowledge of concepts is more or less limited to mainstream mathematics. Specialisation is absent in these levels and, thus, our idea is to take students who are passionate about maths out of the general examination appr-oach and to a pure and applied form,” Vinay Nair, one of the co-founders of RAM, said. “Lack of awareness and knowledge is the prime reason why this programme plays an important role,” he added.

Mr Nair, who also teaches maths in schools and colleges, said that students aren’t aware of career opportunities for those with a special interest in the subject. “If they are good in maths, they opt for engineering through entrance examinations. Meanwhile, what is left unexplored is financial mathematics, mathematics in computer science, mathematics in economics or even a doctorate in Mathematics. Adding to this, our country, which has well-known mathematics from ancient India, is right now being researched by westerners,” he said.

RAM imparts the not-so-famous lessons and concepts from 12th centu-ry mathematicians, which are being developed and evolved in India.

Currently, all programmes are for high school students, parents and teachers.

 

Tags: maths
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT