Monday, Jun 01, 2020 | Last Update : 11:27 AM IST

69th Day Of Lockdown

Maharashtra65168280812197 Tamil Nadu2024611313157 Delhi173877846398 Gujarat1635692321007 Rajasthan83654855184 Madhya Pradesh78914444343 Uttar Pradesh77014651213 West Bengal48131775302 Andhra Pradesh3461228960 Bihar3359120915 Karnataka292299749 Telangana2499141277 Jammu and Kashmir234190828 Punjab2197194942 Odisha17239779 Haryana172194019 Kerala120957510 Assam9361044 Uttarakhand493794 Jharkhand4621914 Chhatisgarh4471021 Chandigarh2891994 Tripura2711720 Himachal Pradesh223634 Goa70420 Manipur6060 Puducherry57230 Nagaland3600 Meghalaya27121 Arunachal Pradesh310 Mizoram110 Sikkim100

Flamingos flock to Talawe wetlands, citizens in awe

THE ASIAN AGE. | SONALI TELANG
Published : Apr 7, 2019, 4:35 am IST
Updated : Apr 7, 2019, 4:35 am IST

A recent study by the Bombay Natural History Society found that Mumbai was inhabited by 121,000 flamingos.

The Talawe wetland, which was under threat of commercial development for a golf course and residential complex, is now being frequented by flamingos.
 The Talawe wetland, which was under threat of commercial development for a golf course and residential complex, is now being frequented by flamingos.

Mumbai: The Talawe wetland, which was under threat of commercial development for a golf course and residential complex, is now being frequented by flamingos, much to the surprise of locals, some of whom said that their congregation had become bigger after work on the golf course was stopped following a stay by the high court.  

The locals stated that like last year, they had once again come to the wetland area behind the NRI complex at Seawoods in April. “Last year too, they arrived during this time. However, they are larger in number as compared to last year. One of the main reasons could be because the work for the golf course proposed at the site was stopped by the high court. The barricades by the developer have been removed which were earlier driving these birds away,” said Sunil Agarwal, resident of the NRI complex.  

Pawan Kumar Sahu, a bird photographer stated, “There is a greater number of lesser flamingos this time.” Lesser flamingos are relatively smaller with a more pinkish hue while greater flamingos are whitish in colour.  Meanwhile, a comparatively lesser number of the pink birds that otherwise have the largest congregation in the Sewri mud flats was seen this year.

“The flamingos are not present at the jetty side this time due to the MTHL work, but they can be seen at the other side in Sewri. Their number is also less as compared to last year, however it has been observed that their groups have scattered in different parts of Mumbai and Navi Mumbai,” said Pradip Patade, a bird enthusiast.  

A recent study by the Bombay Natural History Society found that Mumbai was inhabited by 121,000 flamingos.

However, the number of greater flamingos which are large in size and whitish in colour is showing a decline. 

Tags: flamingos, bombay natural history society, mthl
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT