Tuesday, Dec 07, 2021 | Last Update : 03:18 AM IST

  Life   More Features  29 Dec 2016  In Peticular: An old, symbiotic bond

In Peticular: An old, symbiotic bond

THE ASIAN AGE. | SANDEEP VARMA
Published : Dec 29, 2016, 12:42 am IST
Updated : Dec 29, 2016, 6:46 am IST

The advancement of medical science has shed more light into the benefit of using pets in our daily life.

The bond is such a longstanding one that it is almost like we are in a symbiotic relationship with our pets. (Representational Image)
 The bond is such a longstanding one that it is almost like we are in a symbiotic relationship with our pets. (Representational Image)

Pets satisfy a deep, universal human need. Our co-existence with pets somehow takes us back to the days when we were ‘one with the nature’. Our frequent craving to take a break from our daily routine and hit the mountains, is perhaps a sign of our evolution from our nomadic ancestors. From nomads to now, ending our lives on a chair, in front of a desk, might have changed drastically but we humans, still find our refuge in nature through our domesticated pets. This bond goes back thousands of years and has proved to have a positive effect on the physical and mental health of its caregiver.

Science has explored the different aspects of this bond and have found that pets have the ability to simulate their caregivers, especially the ones with a troubled past, by giving them someone to take care of, exercise with and also to communicate with. They are also a mood lifter for the depressed. Having a pet might even help people reach their health goal such as to lower blood pressure and to deal with stress. The bond is such a longstanding one that it is almost like we are in a symbiotic relationship with our pets. One that benefits both animals and human beings. The advancement of medical science has shed more light into the benefit of using pets in our daily life.

 

And hey, they also improve one’s social interaction skills. Who doesn’t love a dog and its owner?All this brings us to the premise of Wilsons (1984) biophilia hypothesis. Our attachment and interest in animals might have evolved from the fact that our survival was once partially dependent on signals from animals in our environment, showing safety or threat.
The author is a wildlife biologist with specific interest in herpetology and conservation

Tags: pets, mental health, blood pressure