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  Life   More Features  26 Feb 2018  Allowing children to have pets could turn them vegetarian, says study

Allowing children to have pets could turn them vegetarian, says study

THE ASIAN AGE
Published : Feb 26, 2018, 3:50 pm IST
Updated : Feb 26, 2018, 3:50 pm IST

Research shows that more domestic animals living under family roof increases chances of child going meat-free.

She said that exposure to a greater number of different childhood pets leads to greater restriction of animal products.
 She said that exposure to a greater number of different childhood pets leads to greater restriction of animal products.

While it is a well documented fact that looking after a pet encourages children to be responsible, a new study now says that those with hamsters and gerbils could also be influencing young pet owners’ eating habits in later life.

The study claims that giving a child a pet could ultimately turn them vegetarian, ad the more domestic animals living under the family roof, the higher the chances of a child going meat-free in adulthood.

The study saw psychologist Sydney Heiss, of the State University of New York at Albany, question 325 young adults about their diet and pet-owning history, with the results published in the journal Appetite.

She said that exposure to a greater number of different childhood pets leads to greater restriction of animal products from the diet through more positive attitudes towards animals and a moral opposition to animal exploitation.

She further added, “Individuals who grew up around a greater variety of pets were more likely to engage in greater degrees of meat avoidance in adulthood.”

Tags: child, pet, vegetarian, health and well being, domestic animal, psychologist