Saturday, Jul 04, 2020 | Last Update : 12:08 PM IST

101st Day Of Lockdown

Maharashtra1929901046878376 Tamil Nadu102721583781385 Delhi92175630072864 Gujarat34686249411905 Uttar Pradesh2579717597749 West Bengal2048813571717 Karnataka197108807293 Rajasthan1878515043435 Telangana185709069275 Andhra Pradesh169347632206 Haryana1550911019251 Madhya Pradesh1410610815589 Bihar10911821184 Assam8956583212 Jammu and Kashmir76954856105 Odisha7316535333 Punjab56683989149 Kerala4594243626 Uttarakhand2791190937 Chhatisgarh2339193713 Jharkhand2339160512 Tripura140110931 Manipur13166390 Goa11984783 Himachal Pradesh9796179 Puducherry73930112 Nagaland5351820 Chandigarh4463676 Arunachal Pradesh182601 Mizoram1601230 Sikkim101520 Meghalaya50421
  Life   More Features  23 Sep 2017  Ladies first: Lessons in peace

Ladies first: Lessons in peace

THE ASIAN AGE. | KIRTHI JAYAKUMAR
Published : Sep 23, 2017, 1:32 am IST
Updated : Sep 23, 2017, 1:32 am IST

Everyone in today’s generation is fighting a war on borrowed hatred.

We strive to create peaceful people, through peaceful tools, peaceful language and peaceful ways to solve conflict.
 We strive to create peaceful people, through peaceful tools, peaceful language and peaceful ways to solve conflict.

What comes to your mind when I say ‘education’? Reading? Writing? Or is it arithmetic? For the longest time, the world has suffered — yes, suffered — this understanding of what education means. There is so much attention attached to the literacy component in education, to the extent that people think of education itself as all about making more and more people literate.   

Everyone in today’s generation is fighting a war on borrowed hatred. Think about it. Samuel Huntington was incredibly correct that culture, ethnicity and such individual identity markers would come to sustain differences of opinion. War is deemed good for business and the coffers of a select few enablers, and that vested interest keeps an agenda of promoting hatred as the norm. Terrorist outfits are feeding off the combined effect of marginalisation and borrowed hatred. The world is burning with hatred that is only kept alive through incorrect education that is desperately in need of sensitisation. Whole chapters in history are written by the victor’s hand. Still more are written through a male lens, ignoring myriads of women who have made significant and meaningful contributions through untiring efforts.  

 

We strive to create peaceful people, through peaceful tools, peaceful language and peaceful ways to solve conflict. Conflict is inevitable, but, if we create a proclivity towards peace in people around us, we naturally choose peace, we naturally turn to peace, we naturally prioritise peace, and we don’t have place to escalate conflict at any level. Be it a bully in a classroom or two nations seeking ownership over territory. In that understanding, there is a very simple solution to finding peace in peace education.

Generations of students before me, along with me, and now, after me, have grown up without learning the most important values of life: of empathy, of choosing peace and compassion over hatred and violence, of choosing equality, tolerance and respect for one’s identity.

This International Peace Day, which falls on September 21, incidentally, what if we choose to be purveyors of peace education? What if we taught non-violent communication while teaching rules of grammar, syntax and semantics? What if we taught history with the right telling and with the agenda to prevent repetition of history’s egregious failings? What if we taught geography against the landscape of actual equality — where we learned lessons from the earth’s diversity and imbibed it as positive lessons for peace? What if we taught practical ways to use numbers in a way that had practical solutions to deter from conflict and choose peace instead?

The author is an Indian Women’s rights activist, a peace activist, artist, lawyer and writer

Tags: samuel huntington, international peace day