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  Life   More Features  17 Nov 2019  Less is more

Less is more

THE ASIAN AGE. | ANUSHKA MUKHERJEE
Published : Nov 17, 2019, 12:50 am IST
Updated : Nov 17, 2019, 12:50 am IST

Use only what is necessary and discard the rest — Minimalism is a trend that is washing over the masses both online and offline.

The wave of Minimalism hasn’t missed India — in fact, in a culture that is often associated with elaborate extravaganza, the minimalist lifestyle has found takers who have managed to adopt it while also retaining the essence of the Indian life.
 The wave of Minimalism hasn’t missed India — in fact, in a culture that is often associated with elaborate extravaganza, the minimalist lifestyle has found takers who have managed to adopt it while also retaining the essence of the Indian life.

Less is more — and as minimalism will tell you, less is better, too. Minimalism finds its roots in an art movement in the ’50s, but over the last few years, it has translated into a lifestyle that is being adapted into various ways of living around the world.

The wave of Minimalism hasn’t missed India — in fact, in a culture that is often associated with elaborate extravaganza, the minimalist lifestyle has found takers who have managed to adopt it while also retaining the essence of the Indian life.

 

A completely minimalist lifestyle entails the use of as little utilities as possible — owning only the necessary few sets of clothes, jewellery, furniture and other belongings. The key word here is ‘necessary’: whatever is not necessary is not needed. The online world has embraced this trend with open arms. Many Indian minimalists have taken to social media like Instagram and Youtube to document their lives — and in essence, build a community. Minimalism in home décor, in your wardrobe, in your diet — the Indian way.

But why are Indians flocking toward this trend? Ashish Prakash, a college student puts it simply. “It saves my money and time,” he says. “I’m less concerned about my belongings, and never burdened with decision fatigue. Besides, there is more to life than possessing things.”

 

In a conversation about Minimalism, materialism is never far behind. “Adopting a minimalist lifestyle is not easy for me, because I have always been materialistic,” admits Vidushi Singh, who desires to switch over to the minimalist side. “But I see the need for it. The most attractive thing about Minimalism is the aspect of reducing the clutter in one’s life and consuming only what is essential.”

Online and offline, people are shaping their own ways of conscious consumption. It can be as small as packing minimally for a trip, or as significant as getting rid of your furniture. “I eat similar meals, wear similar outfits every day, read only ebooks, and do not own any furniture,” Ashish shares about his own minimalist lifestyle.

 

Vyshnavi, who runs the website ‘The Indian Minimalist’, enjoys the fact that she doesn’t have to clean, sort or arrange her belongings. “I’ve quit shopping for party wear and traditional events. I only wear my mother’s sarees. Additionally, I don’t buy products that are single use.”

A trend that has changed mindsets, reduced waste, and led to a happier lifestyle — perhaps Minimalism is here to stay.

Tags: youtube, minimalist lifestyle