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Mythological muse

THE ASIAN AGE. | PRIYANKA CHANDANI
Published : May 5, 2019, 4:35 am IST
Updated : May 5, 2019, 4:35 am IST

Artist Paramesh Paul’s paintings are inspired by mythology and depicts his fascination with heritage and love for the Supreme.

With the magical mysticism of Kathmandu, riveting spirituality of Rishikesh, Haridwar, and Panchvati, Paramesh’s portrayals of Nandis from all these places look graceful and bright, both physically and metaphorically with a 3D flick.
 With the magical mysticism of Kathmandu, riveting spirituality of Rishikesh, Haridwar, and Panchvati, Paramesh’s portrayals of Nandis from all these places look graceful and bright, both physically and metaphorically with a 3D flick.

Mythology has always been a point of inspiration for many artists, and whether it is music, painting, theatre or craft, the characters of Indian mythology have always found their way to be the center of attraction. Despite being in the age of technology and abstract art, artists fearlessly put their imaginations of traditional characters on canvas. One such convention artwork can be seen at city-based artist Paramesh Paul’s upcoming exhibition, The Sacred Nandi - the abode of Lord Shiva.

 “I have grown up amid temples of Nandis. I find they are my natural source of attraction and later it inspired me to paint them on the canvas,” says Paramesh, who has merged oil and acrylic mediums along with 3d effect to make it more attractive for the visitors. “I have been working with oils and acrylics and then I took it to 3d because it makes the painting more powerful and reflective to the viewers,” adds artist.

Paramesh began his artistic journey at his hometown in Nadia, West Bengal, with his family sculpting avatars of Gods and Goddesses. It was much later that Paramesh realised his calling for painting when he spent some time at the ISKON temple. “I have been very sincere to my art since the very beginning. When I was staying at the temple, I realised that I want to paint all the characters that attract me since then I have painted what has appealed to me,” expresses the artist.

Born in a potters’ family, he presents all the beautiful elements with creativity quite comfortably. “Painting, for me, has always been a spiritual practice, an act of conscious and creative alignment with the Divine. As one delves deeper into the paintings, one experiences a harmonious rhythm of life imbued with the feeling of transcendence, balance, and oneness with the whole of creation,” says the artist.

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Spiritual and nostalgic in nature, Paramesh’s paintings are inspired by his travel to different parts of India. The artist enjoys the status of being inclined towards spiritual paintings and feels content when people appreciate his work. “I find my journey in a life quite fulfilling as an artist when a viewer appreciates and comes forward to talk to me about my works,” gushes the painter.

With the magical mysticism of Kathmandu, riveting spirituality of Rishikesh, Haridwar, and Panchvati, Paramesh’s portrayals of Nandis from all these places look graceful and bright, both physically and metaphorically with a 3D flick. “When I visited these places and worked there for different projects, I was quite engrossed with the way different structures of Nandis were put at various temples,” recalls the artist. Ask if he infused 3d in his conventional art out of any insecurity, the artist avers saying, old art will never die, it is conventional yet progressive. “Experiments are always welcomed in any art form and I have kept my paintings in their natural way with a pinch of new compositions through 3D technique,” he explains and adds, “My thought is to make it more approachable for people with new creations and experiments.”

While museums have drastically been replaced by online platforms, and conventional art is competing with the new age of abstract art, the artist doesn’t feel apprehensive about his traditional art and concept. “Realistic paintings are the base of this art and then one moves to abstract art. My painting is my signature and later it will have a form, it has a lot to learn from,” he concludes.

The Sacred Nandi, at the Jehangir Art Gallery from 6th May to 12th May 2019.

Tags: mythology, the sacred nandi, iskon temple