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  Life   Health  29 Nov 2016  India an extraordinary paradox: Dr Fiona Godlee

India an extraordinary paradox: Dr Fiona Godlee

THE ASIAN AGE.
Published : Nov 29, 2016, 3:25 am IST
Updated : Nov 29, 2016, 8:38 am IST

The Research to Publication programme (RTOP) is part of BMJ’s commitment to building medical research capabilities around the world.

Dr Fiona Godlee, the editor-in-chief of British Medical Journal.
 Dr Fiona Godlee, the editor-in-chief of British Medical Journal.

One of the key platforms where medical practitioners earn their true acknowledgment is the BMJ (British Medical Journal) Awards, which helps medical organisations by publishing the cutting edge academic research and providing professional development solutions. This year the BMJ Awards had 1500 nominations from South Asia and the final 10 winners received recognition from an eminent jury panel. Arnab Banerjee caught up with Dr Fiona Godlee, the Editor-in-Chief of BMJ. Excerpts.

You called India a paradox in medicine.
India is an extraordinary paradox. In some areas it is still struggling, but in many others it is at the forefront of innovation. It also faces numerous challenges like the infrastructure, the ethical structure and lack of transparency. The lack of primary healthcare is also very evident.

 

Recently, we faced dangerous levels of pollution due to burning of crop residue. How do we tackle it?
The burning of fossil fuel from diesel cars, cabs or buses gives rise to hazardous health risks like the heart diseases, premature deaths, cancer and even dementia. This issue has been suppressed because of huge financial consequences of trying to make changes.

What needs to be done?
Only public pressure on the government will make solutions to such threats more effective. Alternatively, the switch to solar and hydro-electric power must happen at the earliest.

Some researchers in the US have warned us of the ill-effects of fast food as major health-related problems. Your comments.  
We need better research on food. We have abandoned many of the traditional diets that were healthy and varied. We made marketing- based low fat diets a solution to everything that led to carbohydrate-based obesity.

 

How does BMJ recognise the researchers in South Asia?
The Research to Publication programme (RTOP) is part of BMJ’s commitment to building medical research capabilities around the world. We also create capacity building and help by other means in the entire process of research. We are looking at ways to help with funding soon.

Tags: pollution, dr fiona godlee, bmj awards