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How effective is computerised testing for ADHD diagnosis?

ANI
Published : May 6, 2018, 3:40 pm IST
Updated : May 6, 2018, 3:40 pm IST

Clinicians with access to the QbTest report were more likely to reach a diagnostic decision about ADHD. 

It improves clinicians' confidence in their decision-making, without compromising diagnostic accuracy. (Photo: File)
 It improves clinicians' confidence in their decision-making, without compromising diagnostic accuracy. (Photo: File)

Computerised test may help improve attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) diagnosis, finds a study.

The clinical trial shows that adding a computerised test of attention and activity (QbTest) to standard care can reduce the time needed to make a diagnostic decision on ADHD, increase the likelihood of excluding ADHD when it is not present, and improve clinicians' confidence in their decision-making, without compromising diagnostic accuracy.

In the randomised, parallel, single-blind controlled trial in mental health and community paediatric clinics in England (the AQUA study), 267 participants aged 6-17 years-old and their clinician were randomised to either receive the QbTest report or not as part of their standard diagnostic assessment for ADHD. 132 out of the 267 participants and their clinicians received the QbTest report.

Clinicians with access to the QbTest report were more likely to reach a diagnostic decision about ADHD. 

At 6 months, 76% of those with a QbTest report had received a diagnostic decision, compared with 50% without. The QbTest reduced appointment length by 15%, increased clinicians' confidence in their diagnostic decisions, and doubled the likelihood of excluding ADHD. There was no difference in diagnostic accuracy.

"The AQUA trial is ground-breaking because it is the first independent randomised-controlled study to demonstrate that an objective assessment technology (QbTest) can increase the speed and efficiency of diagnostic decision-making in ADHD. The clinicians who had access to a QbTest report were faster in reaching diagnostic decisions with no overall loss of diagnostic accuracy," said lead author Professor Chris Hollis.

"Interestingly, clinicians with a QbTest report were more likely than those without a QbTest report on a young person to exclude a diagnosis of ADHD. The results suggest that QbTest is ready for implementation within the ADHD assessment pathway in the UK, and other countries with similarly long delays to diagnosis, where it is likely to lead to earlier diagnostic decisions and significant healthcare system efficiencies."

The study appears in the Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry.

Tags: attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (adhd), children, clinicians, diagnostic accuracy, computerised test of attention and activity, journal of child psychology and psychiatry, healthcare system
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