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  Life   Health  02 Nov 2017  Study finds humans have more empathy for dogs than for other people

Study finds humans have more empathy for dogs than for other people

THE ASIAN AGE
Published : Nov 2, 2017, 5:38 pm IST
Updated : Nov 2, 2017, 5:38 pm IST

Researchers say humans are more moved by suffering dogs because they appear more helpless.

The study found we are moved the most by the suffering of puppies and children, but battered dogs elicited more empathy than abused humans. (Photo: Pixabayexels)
 The study found we are moved the most by the suffering of puppies and children, but battered dogs elicited more empathy than abused humans. (Photo: Pixabayexels)

A new study now shows that humans are more moved by the suffering of canines than people as animals are more helpless than humans ans less able to defend themselves.

In a new research, scientists described a report about an attack 'with a baseball bat by an unknown assailant' and each time the victim changed. The study found we are moved the most by the suffering of puppies and children, but battered dogs elicited more empathy than abused humans.

 

According to Professor Jack Levin and Professor Arnold Arluke, from Northeastern University in Boston, respondents were significantly less distressed when adult humans were victimised', researchers wrote.

The findings suggest people really do see their dogs as members of the family.

This research is backed up by a 2015 charity campaign.  

According to Professor Levin, who spoke at the American Sociological Association,

the fact adult human crime victims receive less empathy than do child, puppy, and full-grown dog victims suggests adult dogs are regarded as dependent and vulnerable not unlike their younger canine counterparts and kids. The story was originally published in The Times.

 

Professor Levin reckoned findings would be similar for cats.

Tags: dog, pet, puppy, pets and environment, empathy, humans