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  Life   Art  05 Apr 2018  Living on the edge of the crafts

Living on the edge of the crafts

THE ASIAN AGE. | ALKA RAGHUVANSHI
Published : Apr 5, 2018, 1:07 am IST
Updated : Apr 5, 2018, 1:07 am IST

Interestingly enough, these seasonal workers constitute a large section of craft workers and fill in an important gap of various.

This is the time when several farm hands get busy with carrying out small-time activity relating to the crafts.
 This is the time when several farm hands get busy with carrying out small-time activity relating to the crafts.

Rural belts are bearing the brunt of half-baked education resulting in creating lumpen elements who don't want to follow traditional or filial professions like farming and weaving and other skill-based activities but have set their eyes on becoming ‘office’ workers That they often end up regretting their decision is a moot point...

Of late, I have been involved in a lot of textile-oriented projects and interacted with weavers, cooperative societies, witnessed weavers graduating from one loom to 10 looms and then vice versa. At one level, we are happy to tout these craftsmen as repositories of our culture and heritage, at another, we do very little to offer them avenues for growth or upgrade their skills. It is a pity because the marketplace is flooded with inferior quality stuff and the worthy artisans are going out of business.

 

In fact , there is a lot of confusion when we tend to put everyone in the category of artisans, not realising that there is a large population of artisans who are occasional or seasonal ones. As it is, there is a shrunk market for various crafts with audiences and consumers of these crafts tend to confuse the true blue kaarigar or craftsperson with seasonal fellows and crafts, in general, getting a bad name. As anyone with the slightest knowledge of farming knows, there are long periods of hiatus when there is nothing to be done except waiting for sowing, reaping or hoeing. This is the time when several farm hands get busy with carrying out small-time activity relating to the crafts.

 

I place in this category even those who cook specific foods in specific seasons like gur-makers in winter or chaat and mithaimakers in melas or bhadbhujars who indulge in making til gajaks, peanut pattis and roasted peanuts in winters and selling them on the streets or chik screenmakers in summer.

Interestingly enough, these seasonal workers constitute a large section of craft workers and fill in an important gap of various crafts required during specific regional festivals and seasons. However, since they are not part of the relatively more organised sector of crafts persons, they fall into neither category but are part of the marginalised sections.

 

Needless to say, because of their marginalised status, they don’t fall into any categorisation and there are no schemes under which they can either upgrade their skills and earn better or come into the mainstream of crafts persons — that is if crafts can be dubbed a mainstream activity at all. The point that I am trying to make is that while the struggle to establish reference points to govern and grade the crafts sector continues, there is a vast under-noticed majority of artisans who fall in between categories and often need a helping hand in finding raw materials, markets or really speaking a supply chain of sorts and temporary help if a season suffers for some natural or other reason.

 

Save an occasional “seasonal” story in the media most often everyone turns a blind eye to the plight of these unsung sections who often follow unusual professions like masseurs and even ear cleaners during their off-peak periods. I have often wondered as to what leads them to follow these traditional yet not-so-popular professions in the larger spectrum of things. Is it only need based? Do they stem from lack of skill alone?

I think it is largely need-based skill acquired over a period of time at the family level that pushes people to try their hand at more than one profession and obviously earning those extra bucks is a huge incentive and propellant.

 

Thanks to various economic situations, many workers even in relatively more organised sectors have been forced to return home when the small scale businesses have folded up or cut down activity, the fate of the various such seasonal artisans is an area of concern for not only shrinking livelihoods but how it will impact the social fabric in rural belts. 

Rural belts are bearing the brunt of half-baked education resulting in creating lumpen elements who don’t want to follow traditional or filial professions like farming and weaving and other skill-based activities but have set their eyes on becoming “office” workers (read office boys). That they often end up regretting their decision is a moot point, but the fact remains that this ever growing tribe is the type who formed the largest number of migrant workers in the first place.

 

How this return to home base can be handled to better their lot and keep them rooted and incorporate them part of the “Make in India” skill development programme is something that needs to be looked into if we want them to join the mainstream. How we can do it is really up to sensible practical policies and their intelligent and honest implementation? I hate the thought of them sinking further into the quagmire of exploitation for no fault of theirs.

While we are at it, this might be the best time to reorganise the education syllabus in identifiable crafts pockets to impart skill-based education and enough education to enable them to run their businesses rather than the three Rs type of general education that serves no purpose for a vast majority of people especially in rural belts and crafts sectors. It would make far more sense to involve them into crafts sectors so that they continue to become preservers and repositories of our crafts culture and self-sufficient and out of the purview of exploitative situations or migrant populations who seek succour in urban areas.

 

The writer is curator, art writer and an artist  and can be contacted on alkaraghuvanshi@yahoo.co

Tags: make in india, culture and heritage, education syllabus