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For the love of Spain

| DIPTI
Published : Jan 30, 2016, 10:39 pm IST
Updated : Jan 30, 2016, 10:39 pm IST

Celebrate the fierce and saucy spirit of Spain with deep crimson and black, bows, frills and sexy lace in modern-day renditions of spanish couture

Spanish-inspired creations from Oscar de la Renta, Proenza Schouler; Dolce and Gabbana creations for women and men respectively.
 Spanish-inspired creations from Oscar de la Renta, Proenza Schouler; Dolce and Gabbana creations for women and men respectively.

Celebrate the fierce and saucy spirit of Spain with deep crimson and black, bows, frills and sexy lace in modern-day renditions of spanish couture

Normally, when asked to name the most influential country in the modern world in terms of fashion, France comes to mind. Although France seems to have dominated the industry in the past few centuries, in the early 16th century Spain was actually at the forefront of world fashion because of its beautifully embroidered designs and colourful clothing. Taking a cue from the same, designers are recreating the saucy and colourful attitudes of Spain and its culture in detailed embroideries, pom-pom trims and colourful beading adorned in the season’s best silhouettes.

“Spanish traditional clothing was heavily influenced by the Moorish culture that dominated parts of the Iberian Peninsula from the 711 century until their expulsion in 1492. It popularised rich embroideries with the introduction of the needle, the use of jewels (often as buttons) and perfume as well as heavy girdles and collars,” explains designer Neeta Lulla. “The colour black too became highly popular especially for special events, and both men and women started wearing heavy gold necklaces with precious stones to create a strong contrast. Additionally, clothes in Spain were often made of rich and heavy fabrics and decorated with gold or silver threads. Back then, Spanish fashion included Spanish capes, corsets and farthingales, which became popular all over Western Europe. However, the styles were cumbersome for Renaissance women as it took them hours to get dressed. Slowly these clothes and fashions failed to evolve with the rapidly changing times.

As a result, Spanish traditional fashion eventually became outdated and gave way to French dominance,” she adds.

Talking about the modern-day renditions, designer Gautam Gupta elaborates, “Spanish matador jackets and flamenco dancer-inspired dresses are the two key highlights that are highly dominant. Unlike traditional Spanish clothing, the silhouettes are simple and strong, alternating between romantic full skirts with corsets and thigh-high stockings, and plenty of leg. Lace skirts, bias-cut chiffon evening dresses, embellished jackets, masculine tailoring and white shirts can give you that quintessential flamenco whirl, while adding a fringed shawl and flat-topped hats or leather pannier bags will ensure that you stand out.”

About the fabric story, designer Niasha Nagpal suggests, “Looking glamorous and being comfortable in whatever you are wearing should be first and foremost kept in mind. Fabrics like satin, georgette, jersey, nylon, suede, leather, silk, rayon, cotton blend, cotton viscose and nets, which are comfortable, flowy and provide the perfect diva feel to any attire are perfect choices to don the trend.”

Accessories are important too, says designer Arjun Saluja. “Accessorisation should be minimal for this trend to keep the focus on the garment. However, you can on special occasions, pile on your gold and silver accessories. Pair them with white or printed leather pumps, moon cut or bucket bags, etc. For a more casual affair you can go for a summery dress with bib-like necklaces and comfy slippers. Also keep in mind that the trend is meant for formal spaces. So stay away from it when you are dressing for work. Also, I would suggest that you lay off neon hues,” he says.