Saturday, Aug 08, 2020 | Last Update : 05:18 AM IST

136th Day Of Lockdown

Maharashtra49026232728117092 Tamil Nadu2850242275754690 Andhra Pradesh2069601204641842 Karnataka164924842322998 Delhi1427231282324082 Uttar Pradesh113378668341981 West Bengal89666630601954 Telangana7525753239601 Bihar7179446294400 Gujarat68855517922604 Assam5549737225132 Rajasthan4941835186763 Odisha4255028698292 Haryana4005433444467 Madhya Pradesh3729827621962 Kerala3170019147103 Jammu and Kashmir2392716218449 Punjab1901512491462 Jharkhand140705199129 Chhatisgarh10109761369 Uttarakhand8008484795 Goa7075511460 Tripura5520367528 Puducherry4147253758 Manipur301818147 Himachal Pradesh2879171013 Nagaland24056594 Arunachal Pradesh179011053 Chandigarh120671520 Meghalaya9173305 Sikkim7832971 Mizoram5022820
  Nigerian royals hail UK university move on statue

Nigerian royals hail UK university move on statue

Published : Mar 22, 2016, 12:52 am IST
Updated : Mar 22, 2016, 12:52 am IST

Nigerian royals have welcomed moves at Britain’s Cambridge University to return a bronze cockerel stolen with other artefacts during colonialist looting in the 19th century.

Nigerian royals have welcomed moves at Britain’s Cambridge University to return a bronze cockerel stolen with other artefacts during colonialist looting in the 19th century.

Jesus College earlier this month said it was taking down the statue, known as “Okukor”, pillaged from the former kingdom of Benin and was looking at the possibility of its repatriation.

 

The move followed a student protest and came as their counterparts at Oxford University mounted a campaign to remove a statue of British imperialist and donor Cecil Rhodes at Oriel College.

The kingdom of Benin was one of the greatest and richest in West Africa and at its height extended as far as modern-day Ghana. The younger brother of the Oba (king) of Benin, Prince Edun Akenzua, described the cockerel’s removal as a “welcome development”.

“We knew we have this kind of thing in Cambridge and we have always called for its return and the other 3,500 to 4,000 artefacts carted away during the 1897 invasion of the palace.

“We commend the initiative of the Cambridge students. They have done what they should do. We appeal to European countries to return our cultural properties dotting museums and galleries in London, Paris, Berlin and other cities around the world,” he said.

 

The tale of the artefacts began when nine British officers were killed while on a trade mission to the then-independent kingdom of Benin in 1897. The British reaction was fierce, leaving thousands dead as the city was set ablaze and looted.