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  Trend to dye for

Trend to dye for

| DIPTI
Published : Aug 27, 2016, 10:18 pm IST
Updated : Aug 27, 2016, 10:18 pm IST

Channel your inner hippie with the oldest fashion technique — tie-dye as it gets a high-fashion makeover with vivid patterns across a range of silhouettes

MAIN PICTURE.jpg
 MAIN PICTURE.jpg

Channel your inner hippie with the oldest fashion technique — tie-dye as it gets a high-fashion makeover with vivid patterns across a range of silhouettes

Tie-and-dye is all grown up, thanks to psychedelic treatments of several designers around the globe. Moving away from its hippie beginnings (as the West likes to propagate), the new dyeing techniques are lending fresh perspectives to the modern and moody dressing for a more refined take.

 

“Contrary to the popular belief, tie-dye wasn’t the brainchild of American hippies of the 1960s. If researches are anything to go by, the conventional methods of the tie-dye technique originated in India, Japan and Africa as early as the sixth century. The oldest known tie-dye tradition that is still practiced in our own country is Bandhani. Another form of tie-dye is Shibori, which is a Japanese technique where indigo is primarily used to form patterns. This technique entered the American turf in the 1960s through the youth movement that advocated the sexual revolution, psychedelic rock and protested the Vietnam War also popularly known as the hippie movement. Hence, they aren’t the inventors but just followers,” says designer Shruti Sancheti.

 

But, just how has the capacity to tie, twist and dye become a trend frontrunner in 2016 “Through modern silhouettes,” say designers Kiran and Meghna of Myoho, adding, “Instead of free-flowing silhouettes that the technique has been usually associated with earlier, tie-dye is now seen on jacquard coats, cargo jackets and flares swathed in khakis and vivid patterns and prints inspired from the wild plains of Africa. Tie-dyed in saturated colours, a lot of silhouettes like crepe skirts cut high to the waist, midi-length dresses and thigh-baring splits, retain maturity.”

It is also a great alternative for people who are bored of flaunting the habitual summer staple such as florals, asserts head of design at Max Fashion, Kamakshi Kaul. She says, “Just be cautious and wear one item at a time as like many other patterned trends, it’s important not to go overboard. Source one key piece, such as a top or skirt and make sure the rest of your outfit is neutral. Indulge in a grey tie-dye t-shirt and layer it up with a light-weight trucker jacket and worn out jeans. The benefit of this type of muted, monochromatic iteration of the classic tee is that you can really wear it with anything and you won’t look absurd whereas the classic rainbow version or even those with two or more colours can look like a summer camp craft project. The best way to wear tie-dye in 2016 is pared down, washed out and roughed up. However, if you are a sucker for colours and aren’t afraid to go all the way, then there is absolutely no need to be afraid either and be sure to embrace tie-dye’s psychedelic heredities; for something a little chicer opt for pieces that contain shades within the same colour family. This season, it really is a case of do or dye.”

 

Shruti agrees and suggests, “By sticking to one or two hues, you will sport a toned down look yet manage to maintain a groovy and chic vibe. Pair your tee with solid coloured basics as even the simplest tie-dye shirt can be a little wild. And there is no need to include the entire colour spectrum in one piece of clothing.”