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  Opinion   Edit  25 Jan 2021  AA Edit | Is power only language in which to talk farm laws?

AA Edit | Is power only language in which to talk farm laws?

THE ASIAN AGE.
Published : Jan 25, 2021, 8:54 am IST
Updated : Jan 25, 2021, 8:54 am IST

The government must show the same spirit of accommodation and seriousness of purpose while sitting with the farmers next time

The government, as Mr Tomar has stated, has been insisting that the laws are for the good of the farmers and the agriculture sector. (PTI/Shahbaz Khan)
 The government, as Mr Tomar has stated, has been insisting that the laws are for the good of the farmers and the agriculture sector. (PTI/Shahbaz Khan)

Agriculture minister Narendra Singh Tomar’s statement to the farmers’ unions during the 11th round of talks that there are no problems with the farm laws and that the government offered to suspend them for up to 18 months as a sign of respect for farmers is unhelpful, to say the least, in ending the stalemate. Instead, it casts a shadow over the sincerity the government displays in the talks.

It has been almost three months now that the farmers are in Delhi, agitating, demanding the repeal of the three laws that seek to rework the way agriculture in this country is conducted. They also want a legal assurance that the minimum support price (MSP) regime is retained. The government has been non-committal on all these demands.

 

The Samyukt Kisan Morcha, the umbrella union of the 40 agitating farmers unions, cannot be faulted for rejecting the government’s offer to suspend the laws and discuss them “clause by clause” for many reasons. First, such an offer has no legal backing. A bill, passed by Parliament and signed into law by the President, cannot be kept in abeyance by the government. There has been no legal mechanism to ensure the laws are not acted upon, except that the government may delay the framing of the rules, but that cannot be a legitimate route a government can take while negotiating on critical laws that have serious ramifications for the future.

 

The government, as Mr Tomar has stated, has been insisting that the laws are for the good of the farmers and the agriculture sector. The farmers, on the other hand, fear that it’s a bogey the government advances and that it would, ultimately, want to withdraw from the sector and throw them at the mercy of the corporates. The government can either say the laws are good or they are bad; and it has said they are good. It is up to the government to explain what it seeks to gain by sticking to its stand and then offering negotiation, at a juncture when the Supreme Court has stayed the operation of the laws. Second, the farmers cannot be faulted for not taking the bait of clause-by-clause discussions as the government had failed to follow the regular, democratic law-making process in this case. It was in an unholy haste to rush them through the legislature.

 

The government agreed to the discussion only after the farmers showed their grit at the gates of the national capital. If the government understands only the language of power, then the farmers need to continue to talk that. The government may be concerned about the elderly farmers suffering in the extremely cold weather of Delhi; but for them, it’s a do-or-die struggle, and they may be willing to pay the price for it.

The government has of late allowed the proposed tractor rally by the farmers’ unions on Republic Day. The government must show the same spirit of accommodation and seriousness of purpose while sitting with the farmers next time. It’s unlikely to reach a conclusion if the government goes into the talks with the stand that all is well with the laws.

 

Tags: delhi farmers protest, agriculture minister narendra singh tomar, samyukt kisan morcha, tractor rally