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  Opinion   Edit  21 Jan 2022  AA Edit | 5G vs aviation: Tech must adapt

AA Edit | 5G vs aviation: Tech must adapt

THE ASIAN AGE.
Published : Jan 21, 2022, 12:52 am IST
Updated : Jan 21, 2022, 12:18 pm IST

The two sides are blaming each other for the major glitch threatening air services despite a long lead-in period to the introduction of 5G

There are billions of dollars involved either way and in an interconnected world aviation is far too crucial not to consider any safety concerns that may stifle connectivity. (Representational Image/ AFP)
 There are billions of dollars involved either way and in an interconnected world aviation is far too crucial not to consider any safety concerns that may stifle connectivity. (Representational Image/ AFP)

There is a knotty 5G problem that might defy an ideal solution as international airlines that fly certain models of wide-bodied aircraft struggle to keep their services going to many major airports in the USA. A strictly temporary solution has been found to the introduction of 5G telecommunication services by limiting their rollout within two miles of airports to address the safety concerns of the aviation industry. Meanwhile, a debate rages over who should pay for the alterations needed to ensure people get 5G service while airlines are guaranteed that their planes can fly safely and free of any interference in radio frequencies.

The US is a test case for 5G services, which are being rolled out globally. Asian and European countries that have switched up early to 5G have steered clear of aviation safety issues. They are using lower radio frequencies that are not close to those used by aircraft altimeters, which function on 100-year-old technologies but which assure safety in the event of aircraft taking off or landing in poor visibility or bad weather.

 

The arguments over who should be adapting to the introduction of high tech 5G is what makes the debate reflective of environments in which businesses work and nations govern them. The airlines and the aviation authority are on one side while the wireless companies, which have paid a phenomenal $82 bn for rolling out 5G in the US, and the communications commission. The two sides are blaming each other for the major glitch threatening air services despite a long lead-in period to the introduction of 5G services.

There are costs involved in Verizon and AT&T shifting their 5G services to different radio frequencies in the US so as to allow aviators to be satisfied about safety or the aviation industry to adapt all the altimeters in different aircraft to avert any interference in communications over airwaves. There are billions of dollars involved either way and in an interconnected world aviation is far too crucial not to consider any safety concerns that may stifle connectivity. The White House has a huge role in sorting things out in such a complex situation of altimeters and 5G towers and frequencies but at least the US has billions in telecom revenues to come up with a solution.

 

Tags: 5g services, international airlines