Sunday, Nov 19, 2017 | Last Update : 08:33 AM IST

Georgians were the first to make grape-wine: Research

THE ASIAN AGE / AFP
Published : Nov 14, 2017, 9:07 am IST
Updated : Nov 14, 2017, 9:09 am IST

The world's very first wine is thought to have been made from rice in China around 9,000 years ago.

making the Grapewine is almost 1,000 years older than we previously thought, researchers said. Representational Photo: Pixabay
 making the Grapewine is almost 1,000 years older than we previously thought, researchers said. Representational Photo: Pixabay

The world's earliest evidence of grape wine-making has been detected in 8,000-year-old pottery jars unearthed in Georgia, making the tradition almost 1,000 years older than previously thought, researchers said Monday.

Before, the oldest chemical evidence of wine in the Near East dated to 5,400-5,000 BC (about 7,000 years ago) and was from the ‘Zagros’ Mountains of Iran, said the report in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), a peer-reviewed US journal.

The world's very first wine is thought to have been made from rice in China around 9,000 years ago.

"We believe this is the oldest example of the domestication of a wild-growing Eurasian grapevine solely for the production of wine," said co-author Stephen Batiuk, a senior research associate at the University of Toronto.

Scientists on the team came from the United States, Canada, Denmark, France, Italy, Israel and Georgia. They have been working for the past four years to re-analyze archaeological sites that were found decades ago.

The fragments of ceramic casks, some decorated with grape motifs and able to hold up to 80 gallons (300 liters), were found at two archaeological sites called Gadachrili Gora and Shulaveris Gora, about 30 miles (50 kilometers) south of the Georgian capital Tbilisi.

Researchers used a combination of the latest mass spectrometry and chromatography techniques to identify the ancient compounds. This chemical analysis "confirmed tartaric acid, the fingerprint compound for grape and wine," said the PNAS report.

Researchers also found three associated organic acids -- malic, succinic and citric -- in the residue from the eight jars. This "discovery dates the origin of the practice to the Neolithic period around 6,000 BC, pushing it back 600-1,000 years from the previously accepted date," according to the study.

Tags: wine, grapewine, georgia, history