Saturday, Dec 15, 2018 | Last Update : 07:27 AM IST

Here are animals who grabbed headlines this week

PTI, AP

Published : May 11, 2018, 2:24 pm IST
Updated : Jul 6, 2018, 1:10 pm IST
From tigers getting married in New Delhi to police dogs getting forever homes after retirement in Ecuador, here are animal headlines. (Photos: AP/ PTI)
From tigers getting married in New Delhi to police dogs getting forever homes after retirement in Ecuador, here are animal headlines. (Photos: AP/ PTI)
A female rhino with spotted deer feed on greens at Assam State Zoo cum Botanical Garden in Guwahati.
A female rhino with spotted deer feed on greens at Assam State Zoo cum Botanical Garden in Guwahati.
A Cuban treefrog in New Orleans, where the non-native frogs have established the first population on the U.S. mainland outside Florida. Invasive treefrogs have established themselves in New Orleans, probably arriving on palm trees from Florida that were planted in the Audubon Zoo. The U.S. Geological Survey says the zoo and a neighboring park have the first established population of Cuban treefrogs on the U.S. mainland outside Florida, where they've been multiplying at least since the 1950s.
A Cuban treefrog in New Orleans, where the non-native frogs have established the first population on the U.S. mainland outside Florida. Invasive treefrogs have established themselves in New Orleans, probably arriving on palm trees from Florida that were planted in the Audubon Zoo. The U.S. Geological Survey says the zoo and a neighboring park have the first established population of Cuban treefrogs on the U.S. mainland outside Florida, where they've been multiplying at least since the 1950s.
Pan Pan, an adult male panda bear cub, explores his enclosure at the Calgary Zoo during the opening of its giant panda habitat, Panda Passage, in Calgary, Alberta.
Pan Pan, an adult male panda bear cub, explores his enclosure at the Calgary Zoo during the opening of its giant panda habitat, Panda Passage, in Calgary, Alberta.
Photo provided by the City of San Antonio Animal Care Services Department shows two bobcat cubs, one in back only partially visible. Three people suffered bites when the kittens they rescued from a San Antonio alley turned out to be these ravenous bobcat cubs. The caretakers found the blue-eyed, stub-tailed pair on Saturday and, thinking they were Bengal kittens, took them in.
Photo provided by the City of San Antonio Animal Care Services Department shows two bobcat cubs, one in back only partially visible. Three people suffered bites when the kittens they rescued from a San Antonio alley turned out to be these ravenous bobcat cubs. The caretakers found the blue-eyed, stub-tailed pair on Saturday and, thinking they were Bengal kittens, took them in.
Pphoto provided by John Christensen Jr., Pacific walruses rest on a beach a few miles outside Port Heiden, Alaska. Male walruses traditionally spend summers in the Bering Sea near Bristol Bay about 120 miles north of Port Heiden. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service says they may be seeking new foraging grounds.
Pphoto provided by John Christensen Jr., Pacific walruses rest on a beach a few miles outside Port Heiden, Alaska. Male walruses traditionally spend summers in the Bering Sea near Bristol Bay about 120 miles north of Port Heiden. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service says they may be seeking new foraging grounds.
A police officer receives his new pet, a former police dog, after the official ceremony where 61 police dogs who've spent years sniffing out illegal drugs and who helped rescuers, retired in Quito, Ecuador.
A police officer receives his new pet, a former police dog, after the official ceremony where 61 police dogs who've spent years sniffing out illegal drugs and who helped rescuers, retired in Quito, Ecuador.
Photo provided by the Alaska Department of Fish and Game an Alaska Department of Fish and Game biologist nourishes a grizzly bear cub in Nome, Alaska. The cub was found near a sow that has been killed illegally. The cub was flown to Anchorage and is in the care of the Alaska Zoo. The cub is scheduled for placement in a permanent home at Northwest Wildlife Trek Park in Washington state.
Photo provided by the Alaska Department of Fish and Game an Alaska Department of Fish and Game biologist nourishes a grizzly bear cub in Nome, Alaska. The cub was found near a sow that has been killed illegally. The cub was flown to Anchorage and is in the care of the Alaska Zoo. The cub is scheduled for placement in a permanent home at Northwest Wildlife Trek Park in Washington state.

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