Indian Boxing Federation suspended by AIBA

In a massive jolt to boxing in India, the International Boxing Association has suspended the IABF alleging “possible manipulation” in its recent elections but the body has denied the charge, insisting that the process was “transparent”.

The development which has left the Indian Amateur Boxing Federation (IABF) “stunned” comes within a few days of the International Olympic Committee suspending the Indian Olympic Association.

“Further to the International Olympic Committee’s suspension imposed on the Indian Olympic Association, the International Boxing Association (AIBA) Executive Committee Bureau has decided today December 6 to provisionally suspend the Indian Amateur Boxing Federation (IABF),” the AIBA said in a statement.

“This provisional suspension is also due to the fact that AIBA had learned about possible manipulation of the recent IABF’s election. “AIBA will now investigate this election and especially a potential political link between IOA president, as former chairman of the IABF, and the IABF election,” it added.

During the September elections, outgoing president Abhay Singh Chautala, who was elected IOA president despite IOC’s suspension, was retained in the body as nominated chairman of the body.

The development now also puts a question mark over Chautala’s election as IOA president since he came into the fray as an IABF representative. Interestingly, his brother-in-law and BJP MLA from Rajasthan, Abhishek Matoria, was elected as the new IABF president.

Stunned by the suspension, Matoria said that the world body had been apprised of the election process in detail. “AIBA had specific queries about the election process and we had explained to them that there was no manipulation. Those who got elected were unanimous choices and just because there was unanimity, the AIBA cannot allege manipulation,” Matoria told PTI.

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