Saturday, Jan 20, 2018 | Last Update : 10:29 PM IST

Doctors wear black badges to work to protest against medical panel bill

PTI
Published : Jan 3, 2018, 1:00 am IST
Updated : Jan 3, 2018, 1:03 am IST

Earlier in the day, patients visiting the city from the suburban areas had complained that they were made to wait for long hours.

West Bengal Medical Council members take out a rally from Medical College to Esplanade on Tuesday to protest against the Central government decision on Medical Council of India. (Photo: Asian age)
 West Bengal Medical Council members take out a rally from Medical College to Esplanade on Tuesday to protest against the Central government decision on Medical Council of India. (Photo: Asian age)

Kolkata: Doctors across the state wore black badges to work on Tuesday to protest against the National Medical Commission (NMC) Bill that seeks to replace the Medical Council of India (MCI) with a new body.

Healthcare services remained largely normal across the state with the outpatient departments (OPD) of National Medical College and Hospital, NRS Medical College and Hospital and RG Kar Hospital attending to the patients like any other day, West Bengal Medical Council (WBMC) chairman Dr Nirmal Maji told PTI on Tuesday.

Maji also condemned the bill that was tabled in Parliament on Friday and said it would ruin the medical infrastructure in the country.

“This is a Tughlaqi decision. This is a dangerous move and may ruin the medical system in the country. The bill will be a boost for quack doctors,” Maji told PTI on Tuesday.

Around 76,325 doctors in the state would be participating in today’s protest, he said.

“I have spoken to chief minister Mamata Banerjee this morning and she has given instructions for ensuring normal services. And our doctors, unlike some other states, are not skipping work. They are wearing black badges to work as a mark of protest,” Maji said.

A protest rally, organised in the city after OPD hours, witnessed the participation of doctors affiliated to the IMA’s state unit and WBMC in large numbers.

Earlier in the day, patients visiting the city from the suburban areas had complained that they were made to wait for long hours. “I have come all the way from Sundarbans for an appointment with a cardiologist. I collected my ticket as early as 9.30am but was made to wait for several hours,” 73-year-old cardiac patient Pritilata Sammadar told PTI outside NRS Medical College and Hospital.

The scene was similar at other city hospitals this morning, where patients were seen queuing up outside the orthopaedic section.    

Tags: national medical commission, medical council of india