Tuesday, Aug 04, 2020 | Last Update : 11:39 AM IST

133rd Day Of Lockdown

Maharashtra45019628703015842 Tamil Nadu2632222022834241 Andhra Pradesh166586886781537 Karnataka139571625002594 Delhi1384821242544021 Uttar Pradesh97362553931778 West Bengal78232548181731 Telangana6766048609551 Gujarat64684476632504 Bihar5956738508336 Rajasthan4555532051719 Assam4527633429109 Haryana3717330470440 Odisha3629723074248 Madhya Pradesh3428524099900 Kerala268731527885 Jammu and Kashmir2200614032407 Punjab1852711882442 Jharkhand135004794125 Chhatisgarh9820725661 Uttarakhand7800453890 Goa6816487656 Tripura5389360527 Puducherry3982241156 Manipur292017667 Himachal Pradesh2818165813 Nagaland21296574 Arunachal Pradesh175810633 Chandigarh116070619 Meghalaya9022645 Sikkim6882971 Mizoram4962660
  Life   Health  22 Jul 2019  Heroine users don’t like to be termed ‘addicts’

Heroine users don’t like to be termed ‘addicts’

ANI
Published : Jul 22, 2019, 11:12 am IST
Updated : Jul 22, 2019, 11:12 am IST

Heroin users don't like to be called addicts: Study.

The terms that most respondents never wanted to be called were 'heroin misuser' and 'heroin-dependent,' and most did not like slang terms such as 'junkie.' (Photo: ANI)
 The terms that most respondents never wanted to be called were 'heroin misuser' and 'heroin-dependent,' and most did not like slang terms such as 'junkie.' (Photo: ANI)

Washington: Heroin users prefer being called as 'people who use drugs' instead of addicts, researchers suggest.

In the ongoing opioid crisis, many researchers and clinicians now use "person-first" terms such as "person with substance use disorder" instead of loaded labels like "addict," but now, a study published in the journal of Addiction has focused on the language preferences of this population.

 

"In the end, researchers, clinicians, and families should not automatically use the same terms that people who use heroin call themselves, but instead ask about preferences. Of course, most people just want to be called by their name," said senior study author Dr Michael Stein.

The researchers surveyed 263 people undergoing in-patient evaluation and withdrawal symptom management in Fall River, Massachusetts. The terms that most respondents never wanted to be called were "heroin misuser" and "heroin-dependent," and most did not like slang terms such as "junkie."

"Persons who use heroin often complain about interactions with healthcare providers, due at least in part to the unfortunate language providers use, which is taken, sometimes rightly, as a sign of disrespect. Such antagonism can't be good for clinical outcomes," Stein said.

 

"We hope this research will inform future work centring on the perspectives of individuals who use drugs and begin to establish connections between the language that individuals use to describe themselves and treatment engagement," said the study's lead author, Dr Ekaterina Pivovarova.

Tags: addiction, cannabis, drug addicts