Thursday, Nov 15, 2018 | Last Update : 12:10 PM IST

Eco art warrior

THE ASIAN AGE. | AYESHA JAIN
Published : Jul 12, 2018, 1:03 am IST
Updated : Jul 12, 2018, 1:02 am IST

Kala Drishti is using art to beautify and transform a village, and spread awareness about environmental issues.

Anjali Jain was always passionate about art — ever since she was a child, “but in those days it wasn’t encouraged,” she says.
 Anjali Jain was always passionate about art — ever since she was a child, “but in those days it wasn’t encouraged,” she says.

Art is not merely for art’s sake and can break many barriers. It is also a great way to shed light on important issues and serious concerns. NGO Kala Drishti’s recent project under the guidance of city-based artist Anjali Jain is using art to promote awareness around issues of environment.

In a city repeatedly blanketed with smoke where the effects of global warming are increasingly tangible, Anjali Jain believes in using art as a form of education. Kala Drishti is working toward cleaning a village and beautifying it with handmade designs, encouraging children to plant more oxygen-giving trees and plants, and making art out of waste that’s being collected. Jain hopes to not just make art a successful end (a benefit for the artists) but also a means to make the society we live in a cleaner, more aware place.

Anjali Jain was always passionate about art — ever since she was a child, “but in those days it wasn’t encouraged,” she says. Her efforts led to the foundation of Kala Drishti. It came into being after Anjali realised that fine art was something much misinterpreted in our country. “Other arts like music, dance and photography are much more promoted and accepted than fine art. With Kala Drishti, I’m trying to promote struggling artists and showcase their work.”

Anjali, who was in the tourism industry before the organisation of Kala Drishti, says, “Even then, after leaving tourism, I starting painting and participated in several exhibitions, but I felt insufficient — I had done administration, even looked after Dilli Haat for a few years.”

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Anjali left her administrative job and dedicated her time to helping artists struggling to make a name and a living. She says, “People still ask ‘mera bachcha painting karke kya karega?’ but not everyone can be an engineer or a doctor.”

One of the most distinct things she notices in other countries is the abundance of street art. “In Singapore, Barcelona, Rome, people are just out on the street drawing — I want to do that and take up art in all forms.”

The focus of this project is to “promote the feeling of art — to let the eyes of the people get used to the presence of it.” The aim, therefore, is to fill empty spaces with installations on roads etc. For this, she has in the past curated art at India Habitat Centre and Select Citywalk.

Anjali also strives towards the awareness of art as a form of therapy from trauma and/or the stress of daily life, as a financially sufficient profession, as a life skill that nurtures creativity and as a form of raising awareness about other important issues.

Kala Drishti is also working towards imbibing kids with English lessons and various life skills. 

Tags: kala drishti, anjali jain, dilli haat