Inder Malhotra

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Inder Malhotra

The cuckoo in the nest

As was only to be expected, Sanjaya Baru’s book, The Accidental Prime Minister: The Making and Unmaking of Manmohan Singh, has been slammed by the Prime Minister’s Office and far more furiously by the Congress Party which is obviously enraged more by the timing of the book’s release than its contents.

The Corruptibles

Long years in journalism — both thrilling and troublesome at the same time — have taught me never to conclude that things are so bad that they can’t get worse.

A blunt man with a sharp nib

The sheer scale and intensity of grief over the passing of Khushwant Singh, together with the size of the crowd at his funeral, underscore how popular this eminent author and journalist, as well as a man of many parts, was. This, one must add, was entirely well deserved.

Polls 2014: Ugly as sin

Several distressing events in quick succession underscore how fast the Indian election scene is turning from ugly to uglier. In all fairness, however, let me start with a basic fact that is also encouraging. Indian democracy has been deteriorating tragically over the years. Yet elections here are held regularly and at appropriate time.

The ‘seculiar’ state

Judging by the protracted slugfest between the Congress, the core of the ruling United Progressive Alliance, and the Bharatiya Janata Party, the only other mainstream party that led a coalition government, the National Democratic Alliance, for six years (1998-2004), it would seem that the looming parliamentary poll is going to be an epic battle between “secular and communal forces”.

A Parliament of fowls

Last week the habitually disorderly Parliament of the world’s largest democracy reached its nadir, ironically, on Valentine’s Day.

National security: Little talk, no action

Let me start with a candid confession — I am no admirer of Narendra Modi, the Bharatiya Janata Party’s prime ministerial candidate and Gujarat’s chief minister.

Rahul proposes, voter disposes?

To comprehend fully what went on at the special All-India Congress Committee session at Talkatora Stadium last week, one should look back at the spring of 1999 when, immediately after celebrating its

RWA of the Glass House Society

During Prime Minister Manmohan Singh’s swan song — at his third press conference in a decade that won him no applause — the most depressing moment was reached when the key question on corruption withi

Too little, too late?

If, as generally expected, at the All-India Congress Committee meeting on January 17, the Congress does name its prime ministerial candidate, it would be doing something it has never done before.

Of late, Congress vice-president Rahul Gandhi has been thoughtlessly and in a hurry jumping into every available situation, without verifying basic facts, to criticise the Bharatiya Janata Party.

Madhu Kishwar, as the editor of Manushi, set the feminism agenda for many Indian women decades ago. Madhu Kishwar as chief media admirer of prime ministerial hopeful Narendra Modi is another story completely. The first Kishwar has been declared missing, never to be found.